“Petticoat patronage": elite Scotswomen’s roles, identity, and agency in Jacobite political affairs, 1688-1766

Anita Randell Fairney

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis examines the actions of elite Scotswomen who were involved in the political machinations in support of the Stuart cause between 1688-1766. Drawing upon extensive archival research of women's letters and other primary records, the thesis argues that elite Scotswomen were active participants in Jacobite politics in the social, political and domestic realms. Women, it is shown, were politically active: they used their elite position, wealth, power, skills and connections for the return of the Stuarts to the throne. The research builds upon, and advances, the burgeoning scholarship on eighteenth-century women's political activities, and stresses the hitherto unrecognised contribution women made to Jacobitism in Scotland.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Award date6 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2015

Take-down notice

Embargoed from 07/06/2016 to 27/07/2020
Made publicly available on 27/07/2020

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