Performance Tolerance and Boat Set-up in Elite Sprint Kayaking

K. Ong, Bruce Elliott, Tim Ackland, A. Lyttle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this studi was to examine the inter-relationship between athlete morphology, equipment set-up and performance in. elite sprint kayaking. Correlations applied to data front the 2000 Olympics were used to select the most important links between morphology and boat set-lip - paddle grip width. and foot-bar distance. Associations between body size and the above selected equipment set-ups were calculated using a Pearson correlation matrix, to facilitate the logical selection of independent variables as input for regression analyses. Significant (p < 0.01) regression equations were developed for the prediction of foot-bar distance (r(2) = 0.589: standard. error of estimate (SEE) = 4.48) and paddle grip width. (r(2) = 0.541: SEE = 3.08). Three national-standard sprint kayakers used their Preferred set-up together with modifications of their predicted set-up, derived from Olympic data, to test performance tolerance in sprint kayaking. Mean coefficients of multiple determination over three trials for the three paddlers of 0.91, 0.91 and 0.92 for left paddle force, right paddle force, and paddle angle at water entry, respectively, were recorded when. using their preferred set-up. These data showed that the paddlers produce consistent patterns of motion. The intervention of altering the boat set-tip resulted in varying changes to boat speed. The mean preferred speed for the three paddlers of 4.47 m/s was reduced by 0.07 and 0.10 m/s when the above boat set-up was modified to a predicted and 'predicted plus one standard deviation' respectively. These changes in boat speed were the result of alterations in the mechanics of paddling technique.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-94
JournalSports Biomechanics
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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