Perceived exertion responses to changing resistance training programming variables

Daniel Hiscock, Brian Dawson, Peter Peeling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 National Strength and Conditioning Association. Hiscock, DJ, Dawson, B, and Peeling, P. Perceived exertion responses to changing resistance training programming variables. J Strength Cond Res 29(6): 1564-1569, 2015-This study examined the influence of intensity (%1 repetition maximum [1RM]), tonnage (sets × repetitions × load), rate of fatigue (percentage decrement in repetitions from set to set), work rate (total tonnage per unit of time), rest interval (time between sets), time under load, and session duration on session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE: Borg's CR-10 scale). Here, participants performed a standardized lifting session of 5 exercises (bench press, leg press, lat pulldown, leg curl, and triceps pushdown) as either: (a) 3 sets × 8 repetitions × 3-minute recovery at 70% 1RM, (b) 3 sets × 14 repetitions × 3-minute recovery at 40% 1RM, (c) 3 sets × MNR (maximum number of repetitions) × 1-minute recovery at 70% 1RM, (d) 3 sets × MNR × 3-minute recovery at 70% 1RM, (e) 3 sets × MNR × 1-minute recovery at 40% 1RM, or (f) 3 sets × MNR × 3-minute recovery at 40% 1RM. The sRPE for session A (4 ± 1) was significantly higher than session B (2.5 ± 1), despite matched tonnage. Protocols involving MNR showed no significant difference in sRPE. Work rate was the only variable to significantly relate with sRPE (r 0.45). Additionally, sRPE at 15-minute postexercise (5 ± 2) was not different to 30-minute postexercise (5 ± 2). In resistance training with matched tonnage and rest duration between sets, sRPE increases with intensity. In sets to volitional failure, sRPE is likely to be similar, regardless of intensity or rest duration between sets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1564-1569
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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