People who consider themselves smart do not consider themselves interpersonally challenged: Convergent validity evidence for subjectively measured IQ and EI

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Relatively little research has examined the association between subjectively measured IQ and subjectively measured EI. Furthermore, the possibility of a nonlinear association between subjectively measured IQ and EI has not been examined, which could have implications for evaluating the pervasiveness of the stereotype that very intelligent people tend to struggle with intra−/inter-personal skills. Finally, single-item (percentile) versus multi-item (Likert) approaches to the measurement of subjective IQ and EI have not been compared. On the basis of a community sample (N = 484), the single-item IQ/EI measures and the multi-item IQ/EI measures correlated at r = 0.44 and r = 0.57, respectively. Furthermore, there was no evidence to suggest the associations were nonlinear. The results were interpreted as convergent validity evidence for subjectively measured IQ and EI. Furthermore, the results failed to support the cognitively gifted but intra-/inter-personally challenged stereotype, at least via self-perceptions of intelligence. Finally, researchers are recommended to use multi-item measures of subjectively measured IQ and EI.

Original languageEnglish
Article number110664
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume174
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'People who consider themselves smart do not consider themselves interpersonally challenged: Convergent validity evidence for subjectively measured IQ and EI'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this