People-plant interaction and economic botany over 47,000 years of occupation at Carpenter’s Gap 1, south central Kimberley

India Ella Dilkes-Hall, Sue O’Connor, Jane Balme

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Systematic archaeobotanical analysis, conducted in conjunction with archaeological enquiry at Australian archaeological sites, is still rare despite recent developments. It is still rarer that previously analysed macrobotanical assemblages are revisited over time. Extending on macrobotanical research conducted by McConnell in 1997, this paper presents the results of a recent analysis of Carpenter’s Gap 1 non-woody macrobotanical remains (seeds, fruits, nuts, and other floristic elements) from the deepest square with the longest chronology, Square A2. Over 47,000 years of time is represented in the sequence, and excellent chronological control, coupled with preservation of carbonised and desiccated macrobotanical remains in the earliest cultural units, allows an examination of plant exploitation over time and human responses/adaptations to periods of documented climatic instability. Carpenter’s Gap 1 macrobotanical remains show that diet, subsistence, and site occupation were intimately associated with botanical resources derived from ecologically productive monsoon rainforest environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-47
Number of pages18
JournalAustralian Archaeology
Volume85
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2019

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occupation
interaction
economics
exploitation
examination
resources
time
Interaction
Botany
Economics
Assemblages
Diet
Subsistence
Chronology
Fruit
Archaeological Sites
Resources
Archaeology
Rain Forest
Exploitation

Cite this

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People-plant interaction and economic botany over 47,000 years of occupation at Carpenter’s Gap 1, south central Kimberley. / Dilkes-Hall, India Ella; O’Connor, Sue; Balme, Jane.

In: Australian Archaeology, Vol. 85, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 30-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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