Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping: "It's all in the hips"

Sean David Byrne, Gillian Jessie Weir, Jacqueline Anne Alderson, Brendan Scott Lay, Cyril John Donnelly

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

Pelvic obliquity angles were hypothesised to influence mediolateral (ML) foot position estimates during sporting manoeuvres. Pelvic angles and ML foot position estimates during the weight acceptance phase of sidestepping and straight-line running tasks were obtained from 31 amateur Australian Rules Football players using three different kinematic models. ML foot position was calculated: 1) in the global reference frame, 2) in the pelvis reference frame and 3) in the pelvis reference frame following correction for changes in pelvic obliquity. Significant differences in ML foot position were observed between all three models in both task conditions (p < 0.05). Correcting for changes in time varying pelvic obliquity during running and sidestepping tasks is an important modelling consideration for the reliable measurement of ML foot position when investigating injury and/or stability.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports
EditorsWolfgang Potthast, Anja Niehoff, Sina David
Place of PublicationGermany
PublisherInternational Society of Biomechanics in Sports
Pages81-84
Volume35
Edition1
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Event35th International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports - Cologne, Germany
Duration: 14 Jun 201718 Jun 2017

Conference

Conference35th International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports
CountryGermany
CityCologne
Period14/06/1718/06/17

Fingerprint

Running
Hip
Foot
Pelvis
Football
Biomechanical Phenomena
Weights and Measures
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

Byrne, S. D., Weir, G. J., Alderson, J. A., Lay, B. S., & Donnelly, C. J. (2017). Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping: "It's all in the hips". In W. Potthast, A. Niehoff, & S. David (Eds.), Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports (1 ed., Vol. 35, pp. 81-84). [129] Germany: International Society of Biomechanics in Sports.
Byrne, Sean David ; Weir, Gillian Jessie ; Alderson, Jacqueline Anne ; Lay, Brendan Scott ; Donnelly, Cyril John. / Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping : "It's all in the hips". Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports. editor / Wolfgang Potthast ; Anja Niehoff ; Sina David. Vol. 35 1. ed. Germany : International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, 2017. pp. 81-84
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abstract = "Pelvic obliquity angles were hypothesised to influence mediolateral (ML) foot position estimates during sporting manoeuvres. Pelvic angles and ML foot position estimates during the weight acceptance phase of sidestepping and straight-line running tasks were obtained from 31 amateur Australian Rules Football players using three different kinematic models. ML foot position was calculated: 1) in the global reference frame, 2) in the pelvis reference frame and 3) in the pelvis reference frame following correction for changes in pelvic obliquity. Significant differences in ML foot position were observed between all three models in both task conditions (p < 0.05). Correcting for changes in time varying pelvic obliquity during running and sidestepping tasks is an important modelling consideration for the reliable measurement of ML foot position when investigating injury and/or stability.",
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Byrne, SD, Weir, GJ, Alderson, JA, Lay, BS & Donnelly, CJ 2017, Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping: "It's all in the hips". in W Potthast, A Niehoff & S David (eds), Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports. 1 edn, vol. 35, 129, International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, Germany, pp. 81-84, 35th International Conference on Biomechanics in Sports, Cologne, Germany, 14/06/17.

Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping : "It's all in the hips". / Byrne, Sean David; Weir, Gillian Jessie; Alderson, Jacqueline Anne; Lay, Brendan Scott; Donnelly, Cyril John.

Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports. ed. / Wolfgang Potthast; Anja Niehoff; Sina David. Vol. 35 1. ed. Germany : International Society of Biomechanics in Sports, 2017. p. 81-84 129.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

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AB - Pelvic obliquity angles were hypothesised to influence mediolateral (ML) foot position estimates during sporting manoeuvres. Pelvic angles and ML foot position estimates during the weight acceptance phase of sidestepping and straight-line running tasks were obtained from 31 amateur Australian Rules Football players using three different kinematic models. ML foot position was calculated: 1) in the global reference frame, 2) in the pelvis reference frame and 3) in the pelvis reference frame following correction for changes in pelvic obliquity. Significant differences in ML foot position were observed between all three models in both task conditions (p < 0.05). Correcting for changes in time varying pelvic obliquity during running and sidestepping tasks is an important modelling consideration for the reliable measurement of ML foot position when investigating injury and/or stability.

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Byrne SD, Weir GJ, Alderson JA, Lay BS, Donnelly CJ. Pelvic obliquity and rotation influences foot position estimates during running and sidestepping: "It's all in the hips". In Potthast W, Niehoff A, David S, editors, Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Society of Biomechanics in Sports. 1 ed. Vol. 35. Germany: International Society of Biomechanics in Sports. 2017. p. 81-84. 129