PCR screening of antimicrobial resistance genes in faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children

Joshua T. Ravensdale, Darren Ten Wei Xian, Chooi Ming Wei, Quanjun Lv, Xiajie Wen, Jing Guo, Ranil Coorey, Peter LeSouëf, Fengmin Lu, Guicheng Zhang, Gary A. Dykes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on hospitals and the agricultural industry. In this study, faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children were screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in order to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and to examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries that may influence carriage. Methods: Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened by PCR for the presence of six clinically relevant ARGs. Clinical and demographic data were also collected from each patient. Results: More than 90% of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of ARGs. The exception to this was Chinese-born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage of blaTEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. Conclusions: These data indicate that Chinese children are more likely to carry certain ARGs than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry, which could explain the differences seen in this study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-181
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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Polymerase Chain Reaction
Genes
Industry
Demography
Tetracycline Resistance
Lactams
Gene Order
Macrolides
Aminoglycosides
Microbial Drug Resistance
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Pressure

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Ravensdale, Joshua T. ; Xian, Darren Ten Wei ; Wei, Chooi Ming ; Lv, Quanjun ; Wen, Xiajie ; Guo, Jing ; Coorey, Ranil ; LeSouëf, Peter ; Lu, Fengmin ; Zhang, Guicheng ; Dykes, Gary A. / PCR screening of antimicrobial resistance genes in faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children. In: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance. 2018 ; Vol. 14. pp. 178-181.
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abstract = "Objectives: Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on hospitals and the agricultural industry. In this study, faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children were screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in order to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and to examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries that may influence carriage. Methods: Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened by PCR for the presence of six clinically relevant ARGs. Clinical and demographic data were also collected from each patient. Results: More than 90{\%} of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of ARGs. The exception to this was Chinese-born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage of blaTEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. Conclusions: These data indicate that Chinese children are more likely to carry certain ARGs than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry, which could explain the differences seen in this study.",
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Ravensdale, JT, Xian, DTW, Wei, CM, Lv, Q, Wen, X, Guo, J, Coorey, R, LeSouëf, P, Lu, F, Zhang, G & Dykes, GA 2018, 'PCR screening of antimicrobial resistance genes in faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children' Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, vol. 14, pp. 178-181. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jgar.2018.03.003

PCR screening of antimicrobial resistance genes in faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children. / Ravensdale, Joshua T.; Xian, Darren Ten Wei; Wei, Chooi Ming; Lv, Quanjun; Wen, Xiajie; Guo, Jing; Coorey, Ranil; LeSouëf, Peter; Lu, Fengmin; Zhang, Guicheng; Dykes, Gary A.

In: Journal of Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Vol. 14, 01.09.2018, p. 178-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - PCR screening of antimicrobial resistance genes in faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children

AU - Ravensdale, Joshua T.

AU - Xian, Darren Ten Wei

AU - Wei, Chooi Ming

AU - Lv, Quanjun

AU - Wen, Xiajie

AU - Guo, Jing

AU - Coorey, Ranil

AU - LeSouëf, Peter

AU - Lu, Fengmin

AU - Zhang, Guicheng

AU - Dykes, Gary A.

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Objectives: Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on hospitals and the agricultural industry. In this study, faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children were screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in order to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and to examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries that may influence carriage. Methods: Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened by PCR for the presence of six clinically relevant ARGs. Clinical and demographic data were also collected from each patient. Results: More than 90% of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of ARGs. The exception to this was Chinese-born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage of blaTEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. Conclusions: These data indicate that Chinese children are more likely to carry certain ARGs than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry, which could explain the differences seen in this study.

AB - Objectives: Recent public awareness campaigns on the risk of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic microbes has placed pressure on governments to enforce stricter antimicrobial stewardship policies on hospitals and the agricultural industry. In this study, faecal samples from Australian and Chinese children were screened for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) in order to identify demographics at risk of carriage of these genes and to examine antimicrobial stewardship policies from the two countries that may influence carriage. Methods: Faecal samples from 46 Australian and 53 Chinese children were screened by PCR for the presence of six clinically relevant ARGs. Clinical and demographic data were also collected from each patient. Results: More than 90% of faecal samples from Chinese children tested positive for β-lactam, macrolide, tetracycline and aminoglycoside resistance genes, which was substantially higher than Australian samples. Besides country of origin, no clear trend could be seen to predict carriage of ARGs. The exception to this was Chinese-born children who immigrated to Australia having higher rates of carriage of blaTEM and tetM genes than children born and still living in Australia. Conclusions: These data indicate that Chinese children are more likely to carry certain ARGs than Australian children. The Chinese government has recently implemented strict policies to control the overuse of antibiotics in hospitals. However, many of these policies do not extend to the agricultural industry, which could explain the differences seen in this study.

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DO - 10.1016/j.jgar.2018.03.003

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