Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours: the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France)

Helen D. Bailey, Brigitte Lacour, Léa Guerrini-Rousseau, Anne Isabelle Bertozzi, Pierre Leblond, Cécile Faure-Conter, Isabelle Pellier, Claire Freycon, François Doz, Stéphanie Puget, Stéphane Ducassou, Laurent Orsi, Jacqueline Clavel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate whether parental smoking around the time of pregnancy or maternal consumption of beverages (alcohol, coffee, or tea) during pregnancy were associated with the risk of CBT. Methods: We pooled data from two French national population-based case–control studies with similar designs conducted in 2003–2004 and 2010–2011. The mothers of 510 CBT cases (directly recruited from the national childhood cancer register) and 3,102 controls aged under 15 years, frequency matched by age and gender, were interviewed through telephone, which included questions about prenatal parental smoking and maternal consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and study of origin. Results: No association was seen between CBT and the mother smoking or drinking alcohol, coffee, or tea during the index pregnancy. The OR between CBT and paternal smoking in the year before birth (as reported by the mother) was 1.25 (95% CI 1.03, 1.52) with an OR of 1.09 (0.99, 1.19) for every 10 cigarettes per day (CPD) smoked. The association between paternal smoking and CBT appeared to be stronger in children diagnosed before the age of five years (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.14, 2.02) and for astrocytoma (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.26, 2.74). Conclusion: We found some evidence of a weak association between paternal smoking in the year before the child’s birth and CBT, especially astrocytomas. These findings need to be replicated in other samples, using similar classifications of tumour subtypes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)719-732
Number of pages14
JournalCancer Causes & Control
Volume28
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Coffee
Tea
Brain Neoplasms
France
Smoking
Alcohols
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Alcohol Drinking
Confidence Intervals
Astrocytoma
Pregnancy
Parturition
Beverages
Telephone
Tobacco Products
Neoplasms
Logistic Models
Population

Cite this

Bailey, Helen D. ; Lacour, Brigitte ; Guerrini-Rousseau, Léa ; Bertozzi, Anne Isabelle ; Leblond, Pierre ; Faure-Conter, Cécile ; Pellier, Isabelle ; Freycon, Claire ; Doz, François ; Puget, Stéphanie ; Ducassou, Stéphane ; Orsi, Laurent ; Clavel, Jacqueline. / Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours : the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France). In: Cancer Causes & Control. 2017 ; Vol. 28, No. 7. pp. 719-732.
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title = "Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours: the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France)",
abstract = "Purpose: To investigate whether parental smoking around the time of pregnancy or maternal consumption of beverages (alcohol, coffee, or tea) during pregnancy were associated with the risk of CBT. Methods: We pooled data from two French national population-based case–control studies with similar designs conducted in 2003–2004 and 2010–2011. The mothers of 510 CBT cases (directly recruited from the national childhood cancer register) and 3,102 controls aged under 15 years, frequency matched by age and gender, were interviewed through telephone, which included questions about prenatal parental smoking and maternal consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea. Odds ratios (OR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and study of origin. Results: No association was seen between CBT and the mother smoking or drinking alcohol, coffee, or tea during the index pregnancy. The OR between CBT and paternal smoking in the year before birth (as reported by the mother) was 1.25 (95{\%} CI 1.03, 1.52) with an OR of 1.09 (0.99, 1.19) for every 10 cigarettes per day (CPD) smoked. The association between paternal smoking and CBT appeared to be stronger in children diagnosed before the age of five years (OR 1.52, 95{\%} CI 1.14, 2.02) and for astrocytoma (OR 1.86, 95{\%} CI 1.26, 2.74). Conclusion: We found some evidence of a weak association between paternal smoking in the year before the child’s birth and CBT, especially astrocytomas. These findings need to be replicated in other samples, using similar classifications of tumour subtypes.",
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Bailey, HD, Lacour, B, Guerrini-Rousseau, L, Bertozzi, AI, Leblond, P, Faure-Conter, C, Pellier, I, Freycon, C, Doz, F, Puget, S, Ducassou, S, Orsi, L & Clavel, J 2017, 'Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours: the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France)' Cancer Causes & Control, vol. 28, no. 7, pp. 719-732. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-017-0900-4

Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours : the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France). / Bailey, Helen D.; Lacour, Brigitte; Guerrini-Rousseau, Léa; Bertozzi, Anne Isabelle; Leblond, Pierre; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Pellier, Isabelle; Freycon, Claire; Doz, François; Puget, Stéphanie; Ducassou, Stéphane; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline.

In: Cancer Causes & Control, Vol. 28, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 719-732.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parental smoking, maternal alcohol, coffee and tea consumption and the risk of childhood brain tumours

T2 - the ESTELLE and ESCALE studies (SFCE, France)

AU - Bailey, Helen D.

AU - Lacour, Brigitte

AU - Guerrini-Rousseau, Léa

AU - Bertozzi, Anne Isabelle

AU - Leblond, Pierre

AU - Faure-Conter, Cécile

AU - Pellier, Isabelle

AU - Freycon, Claire

AU - Doz, François

AU - Puget, Stéphanie

AU - Ducassou, Stéphane

AU - Orsi, Laurent

AU - Clavel, Jacqueline

PY - 2017/7/1

Y1 - 2017/7/1

N2 - Purpose: To investigate whether parental smoking around the time of pregnancy or maternal consumption of beverages (alcohol, coffee, or tea) during pregnancy were associated with the risk of CBT. Methods: We pooled data from two French national population-based case–control studies with similar designs conducted in 2003–2004 and 2010–2011. The mothers of 510 CBT cases (directly recruited from the national childhood cancer register) and 3,102 controls aged under 15 years, frequency matched by age and gender, were interviewed through telephone, which included questions about prenatal parental smoking and maternal consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and study of origin. Results: No association was seen between CBT and the mother smoking or drinking alcohol, coffee, or tea during the index pregnancy. The OR between CBT and paternal smoking in the year before birth (as reported by the mother) was 1.25 (95% CI 1.03, 1.52) with an OR of 1.09 (0.99, 1.19) for every 10 cigarettes per day (CPD) smoked. The association between paternal smoking and CBT appeared to be stronger in children diagnosed before the age of five years (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.14, 2.02) and for astrocytoma (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.26, 2.74). Conclusion: We found some evidence of a weak association between paternal smoking in the year before the child’s birth and CBT, especially astrocytomas. These findings need to be replicated in other samples, using similar classifications of tumour subtypes.

AB - Purpose: To investigate whether parental smoking around the time of pregnancy or maternal consumption of beverages (alcohol, coffee, or tea) during pregnancy were associated with the risk of CBT. Methods: We pooled data from two French national population-based case–control studies with similar designs conducted in 2003–2004 and 2010–2011. The mothers of 510 CBT cases (directly recruited from the national childhood cancer register) and 3,102 controls aged under 15 years, frequency matched by age and gender, were interviewed through telephone, which included questions about prenatal parental smoking and maternal consumption of alcohol, coffee and tea. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusted for age, sex and study of origin. Results: No association was seen between CBT and the mother smoking or drinking alcohol, coffee, or tea during the index pregnancy. The OR between CBT and paternal smoking in the year before birth (as reported by the mother) was 1.25 (95% CI 1.03, 1.52) with an OR of 1.09 (0.99, 1.19) for every 10 cigarettes per day (CPD) smoked. The association between paternal smoking and CBT appeared to be stronger in children diagnosed before the age of five years (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.14, 2.02) and for astrocytoma (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.26, 2.74). Conclusion: We found some evidence of a weak association between paternal smoking in the year before the child’s birth and CBT, especially astrocytomas. These findings need to be replicated in other samples, using similar classifications of tumour subtypes.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Brain tumours

KW - Case–control study

KW - Coffee

KW - France

KW - Parental smoking

KW - Tea

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DO - 10.1007/s10552-017-0900-4

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SP - 719

EP - 732

JO - Cancer Causes & Control

JF - Cancer Causes & Control

SN - 0957-5243

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