Parental knowledge and attitudes to childhood hearing loss and hearing services in the Solomon Islands

Annette Kaspar, Obiga Newton, Joseph Kei, Carlie Driscoll, De Wet Swanepoel, Helen Goulios

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective An understanding of parental knowledge and attitudes towards childhood hearing loss is essential to the successful implementation of audiology services. The present study aimed to investigate parental knowledge and attitudes among parents in the Solomon Islands. Methods and materials A total of 100 mothers and 50 fathers were administered a questionnaire via semi-structured interviews. Results Highest parental awareness of aetiology of childhood hearing loss was noted for otitis media (94%), noise exposure (87.3%), and family history (72.7%). The highest parental awareness concerning public health initiatives to reduce/prevent otitis media was noted for routine childhood immunizations (84%) and breast-feeding (76%). Higher rates of knowledge in fathers than in mothers included otitis media (p = 0.038), noise exposure (p = 0.007), and breast-feeding (p = 0.031). Approximately half of parents (56%) agreed that curses may cause hearing loss. Overall parental responses showed positive support for infant hearing screening programs (96%) and school-based ear and hearing health examinations (99.3%). Conclusions High levels of parental readiness and support for childhood hearing services in the Solomon Islands was evident. Knowledge of aetiology of childhood hearing loss was highest for otitis media, noise exposure, and family history. Knowledge and attitudes of fathers to childhood hearing loss and hearing services was either the same or better than that of mothers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume103
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

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