Pandemic clinical case definitions are non-specific: Multiple respiratory viruses circulating in the early phases of the 2009 influenza pandemic in New South Wales, Australia

V.M. Ratnamohan, J.S. Taylor, F. Zeng, K.A. Mcphie, Christopher Blyth, S. Adamson, J. Kok, D.E. Dwyer

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: During the early phases of the 2009 pandemic, subjects with influenza-like illness only had laboratory testing specific for the new A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Findings. Between 25th May and 7th June 2009, during the pandemic CONTAIN phase, A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was detected using nucleic acid tests in only 56 of 1466 (3.8%) samples meeting the clinical case definition required for A(H1N1)pdm09 testing. Two hundred and fifty-five randomly selected A(H1N1)pdm09 virus-negative samples were tested for other respiratory viruses using a real-time multiplex PCR assay. Of the 255 samples tested, 113 (44.3%) had other respiratory viruses detected: rhinoviruses 63.7%, seasonal influenza A 17.6%, respiratory syncytial virus 7.9%, human metapneumovirus 5.3%, parainfluenzaviruses 4.4%, influenza B virus 4.4%, and enteroviruses 0.8%. Viral co-infections were present in 4.3% of samples. Conclusions: In the very early stages of a new pandemic, limiting testing to only the novel virus will miss other clinically important co-circulating respiratory pathogens. © 2014 Ratnamohan et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)5pp
    JournalVirology Journal
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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