Paediatric invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Queensland, Australia, 2002–2011: Young Indigenous children remain at highest risk

Gavin Cleland, Clare Leung, Jenny Wan Sai Cheong, Joshua Francis, Claire Heney, Clare Nourse

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4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Haemophilus influenzae continues to cause invasive disease in children despite widespread Hib immunisation. The significance of non-B serotypes continues to be investigated, with evidence of increased invasive non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi) world-wide. The aim of this study was to examine the current epidemiological and clinical features of invasive H. influenzae disease in children in Queensland, Australia. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all cases of invasive H. influenzae disease in children <18 years of age in Queensland between January 2002 and December 2011. Cases were identified from pathology records and data requested from treating hospitals. Results: Laboratory data were obtained for 144 cases and clinical/demographic data for 123 cases. The majority (72%) of cases were children <5 years of age. Annual incidence rate for all children <5 years was 7.4/100 000, and for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children <5 years was 10.2/100 000. Serotype was reported for 132 isolates, 69 NTHi and 63 encapsulated strains. The most common clinical diagnoses were pneumonia, meningitis and bacteraemia without clinical focus. Of the patients, 5 patients died, and 12 had significant morbidity at hospital discharge. Conclusions: While rates of invasive H. influenzae disease have decreased dramatically following the introduction of Hib vaccination, H. influenzae remains a cause of significant morbidity and mortality, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children remain particularly vulnerable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-41
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

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Queensland
Haemophilus influenzae
Pediatrics
Haemophilus influenzae type b
Morbidity
Bacteremia
Meningitis
Immunization
Pneumonia
Vaccination
Demography
Pathology
Mortality
Incidence

Cite this

Cleland, Gavin ; Leung, Clare ; Wan Sai Cheong, Jenny ; Francis, Joshua ; Heney, Claire ; Nourse, Clare. / Paediatric invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Queensland, Australia, 2002–2011 : Young Indigenous children remain at highest risk. In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 1. pp. 36-41.
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Paediatric invasive Haemophilus influenzae in Queensland, Australia, 2002–2011 : Young Indigenous children remain at highest risk. / Cleland, Gavin; Leung, Clare; Wan Sai Cheong, Jenny; Francis, Joshua; Heney, Claire; Nourse, Clare.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 54, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 36-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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