Oxygen permeability of silk fibroin hydrogels and their use as materials for contact lenses: A purposeful analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Fibroin is a fibrous protein that can be conveniently isolated from the silk cocoons produced by the larvae of Bombyx mori silk moth. In its form as a hydrogel, Bombyx mori silk fibroin (BMSF) has been employed in a variety of biomedical applications. When used as substrates for biomaterial-cells constructs in tissue engineering, the oxygen transport characteristics of the BMSF membranes have proved so far to be adequate. However, over the past three decades the BMSF hydrogels have been proposed episodically as materials for the manufacture of contact lenses, an application that depends on substantially elevated oxygen permeability. This review will show that the literature published on the oxygen permeability of BMSF is both limited and controversial. Additionally, there is no evidence that contact lenses made from BMSF have ever reached commercialization. The existing literature is discussed critically, leading to the conclusion that BMSF hydrogels are unsuitable as materials for contact lenses, while also attempting to explain the scarcity of data regarding the oxygen permeability of BMSF. To the author’s knowledge, this review covers all publications related to the topic.

Original languageEnglish
Article number58
JournalGels
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Oxygen permeability of silk fibroin hydrogels and their use as materials for contact lenses: A purposeful analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this