Overcoming physical seed dormancy in priority native species for use in arid-zone restoration programs

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    Abstract

    © CSIRO 2016.The relative effectiveness of wet- and dry-heat treatments on alleviating physical dormancy (PY) of seeds of seven species of Fabaceae and five species of Malvaceae was determined to optimise seed handling procedures for ecological restoration. Seeds of all species were treated at different temperatures (40-100°C) for various durations (2 and 5min of wet heat, and 5, 10 and 30min of dry heat). Prior to treatment, seeds of all species exhibited low germination (0-38%). As hypothesised, there was variation among species with respect to the efficacy of the heat treatments. In general, wet-heat treatments at temperatures >70°C for 2 or 5min were effective in breaking PY for all Fabaceae species, and two Malvaceae species, with resultant germination typically >75%. For dry-heat treatments, higher temperatures and longer durations were required to achieve similar germination results. In the three Malvaceae species that were least responsive to heat (Abutilon otocarpum, Hibiscus haynaldii and Sida echinocarpa), there was a trade-off between treatment temperature and duration; lower temperatures (
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)401-416
    Number of pages16
    JournalAustralian Journal of Botany
    Volume64
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    seed dormancy
    native species
    arid zones
    indigenous species
    Malvaceae
    heat treatment
    germination
    temperature
    heat
    Fabaceae
    duration
    Abutilon
    Sida
    dormancy
    Hibiscus
    seed
    ecological restoration
    seed treatment
    seeds
    restoration

    Cite this

    @article{9c75e99ea89a45068ab91e33deaf8b86,
    title = "Overcoming physical seed dormancy in priority native species for use in arid-zone restoration programs",
    abstract = "{\circledC} CSIRO 2016.The relative effectiveness of wet- and dry-heat treatments on alleviating physical dormancy (PY) of seeds of seven species of Fabaceae and five species of Malvaceae was determined to optimise seed handling procedures for ecological restoration. Seeds of all species were treated at different temperatures (40-100°C) for various durations (2 and 5min of wet heat, and 5, 10 and 30min of dry heat). Prior to treatment, seeds of all species exhibited low germination (0-38{\%}). As hypothesised, there was variation among species with respect to the efficacy of the heat treatments. In general, wet-heat treatments at temperatures >70°C for 2 or 5min were effective in breaking PY for all Fabaceae species, and two Malvaceae species, with resultant germination typically >75{\%}. For dry-heat treatments, higher temperatures and longer durations were required to achieve similar germination results. In the three Malvaceae species that were least responsive to heat (Abutilon otocarpum, Hibiscus haynaldii and Sida echinocarpa), there was a trade-off between treatment temperature and duration; lower temperatures (",
    author = "Erickson, {Todd E.} and Merritt, {David J.} and Turner, {Shane R.}",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1071/BT16059",
    language = "English",
    volume = "64",
    pages = "401--416",
    journal = "Australian Journal of Botany",
    issn = "0067-1924",
    publisher = "CSIRO Publishing",
    number = "5",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Overcoming physical seed dormancy in priority native species for use in arid-zone restoration programs

    AU - Erickson, Todd E.

    AU - Merritt, David J.

    AU - Turner, Shane R.

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - © CSIRO 2016.The relative effectiveness of wet- and dry-heat treatments on alleviating physical dormancy (PY) of seeds of seven species of Fabaceae and five species of Malvaceae was determined to optimise seed handling procedures for ecological restoration. Seeds of all species were treated at different temperatures (40-100°C) for various durations (2 and 5min of wet heat, and 5, 10 and 30min of dry heat). Prior to treatment, seeds of all species exhibited low germination (0-38%). As hypothesised, there was variation among species with respect to the efficacy of the heat treatments. In general, wet-heat treatments at temperatures >70°C for 2 or 5min were effective in breaking PY for all Fabaceae species, and two Malvaceae species, with resultant germination typically >75%. For dry-heat treatments, higher temperatures and longer durations were required to achieve similar germination results. In the three Malvaceae species that were least responsive to heat (Abutilon otocarpum, Hibiscus haynaldii and Sida echinocarpa), there was a trade-off between treatment temperature and duration; lower temperatures (

    AB - © CSIRO 2016.The relative effectiveness of wet- and dry-heat treatments on alleviating physical dormancy (PY) of seeds of seven species of Fabaceae and five species of Malvaceae was determined to optimise seed handling procedures for ecological restoration. Seeds of all species were treated at different temperatures (40-100°C) for various durations (2 and 5min of wet heat, and 5, 10 and 30min of dry heat). Prior to treatment, seeds of all species exhibited low germination (0-38%). As hypothesised, there was variation among species with respect to the efficacy of the heat treatments. In general, wet-heat treatments at temperatures >70°C for 2 or 5min were effective in breaking PY for all Fabaceae species, and two Malvaceae species, with resultant germination typically >75%. For dry-heat treatments, higher temperatures and longer durations were required to achieve similar germination results. In the three Malvaceae species that were least responsive to heat (Abutilon otocarpum, Hibiscus haynaldii and Sida echinocarpa), there was a trade-off between treatment temperature and duration; lower temperatures (

    U2 - 10.1071/BT16059

    DO - 10.1071/BT16059

    M3 - Article

    VL - 64

    SP - 401

    EP - 416

    JO - Australian Journal of Botany

    JF - Australian Journal of Botany

    SN - 0067-1924

    IS - 5

    ER -