Outcomes of brief versions of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy for diagnostically heterogeneous groups in a routine care setting

Lillian L.Y. Seow, Khan Collins, Andrew C. Page, Geoff R. Hooke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Brief versions of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) may enhance patient outcomes in diverse service settings. This study examined the effectiveness of two DBT-informed treatments for diagnostically heterogeneous groups in routine practice: 5-day group training in DBT skills (DBT-5) and a 12-week DBT program (DBT-12). Methods: : Depression, anxiety, stress, borderline symptoms, self-esteem, and general mental wellbeing were measured at pre-and post-treatment in a sample of inpatients and outpatients (N=395). Rates of clinically significant change on these measures were calculated and effect sizes benchmarked against prior DBT outcome studies. Readmission rates were used to measure treatment response maintenance. Results: : Scores on all measures improved significantly from pre- to post-treatment. DBT-5 and DBT-12 yielded similar effect sizes compared to prior DBT outcome studies. At least 43.5% of patients were classified as recovered or improved regarding borderline symptoms at the end of both DBT-5 and DBT-12. Readmission rates were also low (5%–6.8%). Conclusions: Brief DBT-informed treatments may offer a fast reduction in symptoms and quicker return to functioning.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychotherapy Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 May 2021

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