Otolith growth chronologies: Investigating historic impacts of climate change on tropical fish

Jia Lin Joyce Ong

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    Abstract

    Understanding how marine fishes respond to climate change is critical to ensure the future sustainability and resilience of fisheries. I analysed growth chronologies from the otoliths of tropical fishes to determine their response to climate change. Inter­annual climate variation influenced both intra-specific (life history stages and multiple populations) and inter-specific growth variations. Large-scale climate signals also led to synchronous growth patterns across taxa from different ecosystems (fishes, corals and trees) and among different fish species along the coastline of Western Australia. Climate change is likely to have simultaneous and immediate impacts on the growth and resilience of fishes.
    LanguageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
    Awarding Institution
    • The University of Western Australia
    Award date9 Jan 2017
    StateUnpublished - 2017

    Fingerprint

    otolith
    chronology
    climate change
    fish
    climate signal
    climate variation
    coral
    life history
    fishery
    sustainability
    ecosystem
    coast

    Cite this

    @phdthesis{34f286d2ae0644cd9d7f34160a7014df,
    title = "Otolith growth chronologies: Investigating historic impacts of climate change on tropical fish",
    abstract = "Understanding how marine fishes respond to climate change is critical to ensure the future sustainability and resilience of fisheries. I analysed growth chronologies from the otoliths of tropical fishes to determine their response to climate change. Inter­annual climate variation influenced both intra-specific (life history stages and multiple populations) and inter-specific growth variations. Large-scale climate signals also led to synchronous growth patterns across taxa from different ecosystems (fishes, corals and trees) and among different fish species along the coastline of Western Australia. Climate change is likely to have simultaneous and immediate impacts on the growth and resilience of fishes.",
    keywords = "Climate change, Otolith growth chronologies, Tropical snappers, Western Australia, El Nino-Southern Oscillation, Leewin Current, Synchronous growth patterns",
    author = "Ong, {Jia Lin Joyce}",
    year = "2017",
    language = "English",
    school = "The University of Western Australia",

    }

    Ong, JLJ 2017, 'Otolith growth chronologies: Investigating historic impacts of climate change on tropical fish', Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia.

    Otolith growth chronologies: Investigating historic impacts of climate change on tropical fish. / Ong, Jia Lin Joyce.

    2017.

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

    TY - THES

    T1 - Otolith growth chronologies: Investigating historic impacts of climate change on tropical fish

    AU - Ong,Jia Lin Joyce

    PY - 2017

    Y1 - 2017

    N2 - Understanding how marine fishes respond to climate change is critical to ensure the future sustainability and resilience of fisheries. I analysed growth chronologies from the otoliths of tropical fishes to determine their response to climate change. Inter­annual climate variation influenced both intra-specific (life history stages and multiple populations) and inter-specific growth variations. Large-scale climate signals also led to synchronous growth patterns across taxa from different ecosystems (fishes, corals and trees) and among different fish species along the coastline of Western Australia. Climate change is likely to have simultaneous and immediate impacts on the growth and resilience of fishes.

    AB - Understanding how marine fishes respond to climate change is critical to ensure the future sustainability and resilience of fisheries. I analysed growth chronologies from the otoliths of tropical fishes to determine their response to climate change. Inter­annual climate variation influenced both intra-specific (life history stages and multiple populations) and inter-specific growth variations. Large-scale climate signals also led to synchronous growth patterns across taxa from different ecosystems (fishes, corals and trees) and among different fish species along the coastline of Western Australia. Climate change is likely to have simultaneous and immediate impacts on the growth and resilience of fishes.

    KW - Climate change

    KW - Otolith growth chronologies

    KW - Tropical snappers

    KW - Western Australia

    KW - El Nino-Southern Oscillation

    KW - Leewin Current

    KW - Synchronous growth patterns

    M3 - Doctoral Thesis

    ER -