Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots: analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses

Tino Kreszies, Nandhini Shellakkutti, Alina Osthoff, Peng Yu, Jutta A Baldauf, Viktoria V Zeisler-Diehl, Kosala Ranathunge, Frank Hochholdinger, Lukas Schreiber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is more drought tolerant than other cereals, thus making it an excellent model for the study of the chemical, transcriptomic and physiological effects of water deficit. Roots are the first organ to sense soil water deficit. Therefore, we studied the response of barley seminal roots to different water potentials induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000. We investigated changes in anatomical parameters by histochemistry and microscopy, quantitative and qualitative changes in suberin composition by analytical chemistry, transcript changes by RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the radial water and solute movement of roots using a root pressure probe. In response to osmotic stress, genes in the suberin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated that correlated with increased suberin amounts in the endodermis and an overall reduction in hydraulic conductivity (Lpr ). In parallel, transcriptomic data indicated no or only weak effects of osmotic stress on aquaporin expression. These results indicate that osmotic stress enhances cell wall suberization and markedly reduces Lpr of the apoplastic pathway, whereas Lpr of the cell-to-cell pathway is not altered. Thus, the sealed apoplast markedly reduces the uncontrolled backflow of water from the root to the medium, whilst keeping constant water flow through the highly regulated cell-to-cell path.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-194
JournalThe New Phytologist
Volume222
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

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suberization
Osmotic Pressure
Hordeum
osmotic stress
transcriptomics
chemical analysis
suberin
plant response
barley
Water
apoplast
analytical chemistry
cells
root pressure
endodermis
soil water deficit
soil transport processes
aquaporins
Sense Organs
water

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Kreszies, T., Shellakkutti, N., Osthoff, A., Yu, P., Baldauf, J. A., Zeisler-Diehl, V. V., ... Schreiber, L. (2019). Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots: analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses. The New Phytologist, 222(1), 180-194. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15351
Kreszies, Tino ; Shellakkutti, Nandhini ; Osthoff, Alina ; Yu, Peng ; Baldauf, Jutta A ; Zeisler-Diehl, Viktoria V ; Ranathunge, Kosala ; Hochholdinger, Frank ; Schreiber, Lukas. / Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots : analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses. In: The New Phytologist. 2019 ; Vol. 222, No. 1. pp. 180-194.
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Kreszies, T, Shellakkutti, N, Osthoff, A, Yu, P, Baldauf, JA, Zeisler-Diehl, VV, Ranathunge, K, Hochholdinger, F & Schreiber, L 2019, 'Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots: analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses' The New Phytologist, vol. 222, no. 1, pp. 180-194. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.15351

Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots : analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses. / Kreszies, Tino; Shellakkutti, Nandhini; Osthoff, Alina; Yu, Peng; Baldauf, Jutta A; Zeisler-Diehl, Viktoria V; Ranathunge, Kosala; Hochholdinger, Frank; Schreiber, Lukas.

In: The New Phytologist, Vol. 222, No. 1, 01.2019, p. 180-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Osmotic stress enhances suberization of apoplastic barriers in barley seminal roots

T2 - analysis of chemical, transcriptomic and physiological responses

AU - Kreszies, Tino

AU - Shellakkutti, Nandhini

AU - Osthoff, Alina

AU - Yu, Peng

AU - Baldauf, Jutta A

AU - Zeisler-Diehl, Viktoria V

AU - Ranathunge, Kosala

AU - Hochholdinger, Frank

AU - Schreiber, Lukas

N1 - © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is more drought tolerant than other cereals, thus making it an excellent model for the study of the chemical, transcriptomic and physiological effects of water deficit. Roots are the first organ to sense soil water deficit. Therefore, we studied the response of barley seminal roots to different water potentials induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000. We investigated changes in anatomical parameters by histochemistry and microscopy, quantitative and qualitative changes in suberin composition by analytical chemistry, transcript changes by RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the radial water and solute movement of roots using a root pressure probe. In response to osmotic stress, genes in the suberin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated that correlated with increased suberin amounts in the endodermis and an overall reduction in hydraulic conductivity (Lpr ). In parallel, transcriptomic data indicated no or only weak effects of osmotic stress on aquaporin expression. These results indicate that osmotic stress enhances cell wall suberization and markedly reduces Lpr of the apoplastic pathway, whereas Lpr of the cell-to-cell pathway is not altered. Thus, the sealed apoplast markedly reduces the uncontrolled backflow of water from the root to the medium, whilst keeping constant water flow through the highly regulated cell-to-cell path.

AB - Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is more drought tolerant than other cereals, thus making it an excellent model for the study of the chemical, transcriptomic and physiological effects of water deficit. Roots are the first organ to sense soil water deficit. Therefore, we studied the response of barley seminal roots to different water potentials induced by polyethylene glycol (PEG) 8000. We investigated changes in anatomical parameters by histochemistry and microscopy, quantitative and qualitative changes in suberin composition by analytical chemistry, transcript changes by RNA-sequencing (RNA-Seq), and the radial water and solute movement of roots using a root pressure probe. In response to osmotic stress, genes in the suberin biosynthesis pathway were upregulated that correlated with increased suberin amounts in the endodermis and an overall reduction in hydraulic conductivity (Lpr ). In parallel, transcriptomic data indicated no or only weak effects of osmotic stress on aquaporin expression. These results indicate that osmotic stress enhances cell wall suberization and markedly reduces Lpr of the apoplastic pathway, whereas Lpr of the cell-to-cell pathway is not altered. Thus, the sealed apoplast markedly reduces the uncontrolled backflow of water from the root to the medium, whilst keeping constant water flow through the highly regulated cell-to-cell path.

U2 - 10.1111/nph.15351

DO - 10.1111/nph.15351

M3 - Article

VL - 222

SP - 180

EP - 194

JO - The New Phytologist

JF - The New Phytologist

SN - 0028-646X

IS - 1

ER -