Origins and consequences of tripartite efficacy beliefs within elite athlete dyads

Ben Jackson, P. Knapp, M.R. Beauchamp

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    25 Citations (Scopus)
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    Abstract

    Drawing from Lent and Lopez's (2002) "tripartite" model of relational efficacy, the overall purpose of this study was to examine antecedents and consequences of self-efficacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) within six international-level athlete dyads. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were content analyzed using deductive and inductive procedures. Sources of efficacy emerged in relation to perceptions regarding (i) oneself, (ii) one's partner, (iii) the dyad/relationship, and (iv) external factors. Results also revealed the emergence of a number of salient intrapersonal and interpersonal outcomes, incorporating cognitive, affective, as well as behavioral consequences. Implications for theory development and future research are considered, and applied propositions are discussed with regard to effective relationship management in elite sport.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)512-540
    JournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
    Volume30
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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    Self Efficacy
    Athletes
    Sports
    Interviews

    Cite this

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    Origins and consequences of tripartite efficacy beliefs within elite athlete dyads. / Jackson, Ben; Knapp, P.; Beauchamp, M.R.

    In: Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, Vol. 30, No. 5, 2008, p. 512-540.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AB - Drawing from Lent and Lopez's (2002) "tripartite" model of relational efficacy, the overall purpose of this study was to examine antecedents and consequences of self-efficacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy (RISE) within six international-level athlete dyads. Semistructured interviews were conducted and data were content analyzed using deductive and inductive procedures. Sources of efficacy emerged in relation to perceptions regarding (i) oneself, (ii) one's partner, (iii) the dyad/relationship, and (iv) external factors. Results also revealed the emergence of a number of salient intrapersonal and interpersonal outcomes, incorporating cognitive, affective, as well as behavioral consequences. Implications for theory development and future research are considered, and applied propositions are discussed with regard to effective relationship management in elite sport.

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