Optimizing whole-body kinematics during single-leg jump landing to reduce peak abduction/adduction and internal rotation knee moments: Implications for anterior cruciate ligament injury risk

Dhruv Gupta, Jeffrey A. Reinbolt, Cyril J. Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Knee abduction/adduction moment and knee internal rotation moment are known surrogate measures of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) load during tasks like sidestepping and single-leg landing. Previous experimental literature has shown that a variety of kinematic strategies are associated or correlated with ACL injury risk; however, the optimal kinematic strategies needed to reduce peak knee moments and ACL injury are not well understood. To understand the complex, multifaceted kinematic factors underpinning ACL injury risk and to optimize kinematics to prevent the ACL injury, a musculoskeletal modeling and simulation experimental design was used. A 14-segment, 37-degree-of-freedom, dynamically consistent skeletal model driven by force/torque actuators was used to simulate whole-body single-leg jump landing kinematics. Using the residual reduction algorithm in OpenSim, whole-body kinematics were optimized to reduce the peak knee abduction/adduction and internal/external rotation moments simultaneously. This optimization was repeated across 30 single-leg jump landing trials from 10 participants. The general optimal kinematic strategy was to bring the knee to a more neutral alignment in the transverse plane and frontal plane (featured by reduced hip adduction angle and increased knee adduction angle). This optimized whole-body kinematic strategy significantly reduced the peak knee abduction/adduction and internal rotation moments, transferring most of the knee load to the hip.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)432-439
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

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