Optimal H∞ Insulin Injection Control for Blood Glucose Regulation in Diabetic Patients. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering

F. Chee, A.V. Savkin, Tyrone Fernando, S. Nahavandi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The theory of optimal control has the feature of H∞ minimizing the worst-case gain of an unknown disturbance input. When appropriately modified, the theory can be used to design a “switching” controller that can be applied to insulin injection for blood glucose (BG) regulation. The “switching” controller is defined by a collection of basic insulin rates and a rule that switches the insulin rates from one value to another. The rule employed an estimation of BG from noisy measurements, and the subsequent optimization of a performance index that involves the solution of a “jump” Riccati differential equation and a discrete-time dynamic programming equation. With an appropriate patient model, simulation studies have shown that the controller could correct BG deviation using clinically acceptable insulin delivery rates.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1625-1631
JournalIEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Biomedical engineering
Insulin
Glucose
Blood
Controllers
Dynamic programming
Differential equations
Switches

Cite this

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Optimal H∞ Insulin Injection Control for Blood Glucose Regulation in Diabetic Patients. IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering. / Chee, F.; Savkin, A.V.; Fernando, Tyrone; Nahavandi, S.

In: IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 52, No. 10, 2005, p. 1625-1631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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