Opioid poisoning during pregnancy: prevalence, characteristics, and neonatal outcomes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

While it has been postulated that opioid poisoning during pregnancy may cause adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, the harm associated with opioid poisoning during pregnancy has not been robustly examined. Pregnant women admitted to hospital or presenting to the emergency department (ED) in Western Australia (WA) with a diagnosis of opioid poisoning were identified by linking state midwifery records with hospital and ED administrative data. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were compared with opioid poisoning that occurred in the 12 months prior to conception or the 12 months following birth. Between 2003 and 2018, 57 neonates were born to women who had experienced opioid poisoning during pregnancy (14.1 per 100,000 births) in WA. The incidence of opioid poisoning in the year prior to pregnancy (IRR: 3.04, 95%CI: 2.30, 4.02) and the year following pregnancy (IRR: 1.96, 95%CI: 1.46, 2.64) was significantly higher than during pregnancy. Opioid poisoning during pregnancy was less likely to involve multiple substances and be intentional (rather than accidental). Neonatal conditions associated with in utero hypoxia were significantly less common in neonates born to women who experience opioid poisoning prior to pregnancy compared with during pregnancy (OR: 0.17, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.80). Opioid poisoning in pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of other serious adverse neonatal outcomes. Opioid poisoning during pregnancy is uncommon and less likely to be intentional and involve multiple substances. Opioid poisoning during pregnancy is likely associated with an increased risk of conditions associated with in utero hypoxia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)957-963
Number of pages7
JournalARCHIVES OF WOMENS MENTAL HEALTH
Volume25
Issue number5
Early online date19 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Opioid poisoning during pregnancy: prevalence, characteristics, and neonatal outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this