On using planar microcontractions for extensional rheometry

A.S. Lubansky, Miccal Matthews

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. Planar contractions within a microfluidic environment have shown some potential to be used as a simple, cheap extensional rheometer. In this article, flow within a planar contraction is analyzed using an energy minimization calculation with a measure of slip included. The effect of slip on the calculated flow-field is used to show how the apparent extensional viscosity compares with the true extensional viscosity. In particular, it was found that the apparent planar extensional viscosity would be difficult to determine reliably at either low or high Weissenberg numbers but could be distinguished to some extent at moderate Weissenberg numbers between 0.25 and 1. It was also shown, however, that an unknown extent of slip at the vortex boundary would cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2 in any apparent measure of rheological properties.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)835-864
    JournalJournal of Rheology
    Volume59
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

    Fingerprint

    slip
    Viscosity
    viscosity
    contraction
    rheometers
    Rheometers
    Rheology
    rheology
    Microfluidics
    Flow fields
    flow distribution
    Vortex flow
    vortices
    optimization
    causes
    energy
    Uncertainty

    Cite this

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    title = "On using planar microcontractions for extensional rheometry",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 The Society of Rheology. Planar contractions within a microfluidic environment have shown some potential to be used as a simple, cheap extensional rheometer. In this article, flow within a planar contraction is analyzed using an energy minimization calculation with a measure of slip included. The effect of slip on the calculated flow-field is used to show how the apparent extensional viscosity compares with the true extensional viscosity. In particular, it was found that the apparent planar extensional viscosity would be difficult to determine reliably at either low or high Weissenberg numbers but could be distinguished to some extent at moderate Weissenberg numbers between 0.25 and 1. It was also shown, however, that an unknown extent of slip at the vortex boundary would cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2 in any apparent measure of rheological properties.",
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    On using planar microcontractions for extensional rheometry. / Lubansky, A.S.; Matthews, Miccal.

    In: Journal of Rheology, Vol. 59, No. 3, 2015, p. 835-864.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - On using planar microcontractions for extensional rheometry

    AU - Lubansky, A.S.

    AU - Matthews, Miccal

    PY - 2015

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    AB - © 2015 The Society of Rheology. Planar contractions within a microfluidic environment have shown some potential to be used as a simple, cheap extensional rheometer. In this article, flow within a planar contraction is analyzed using an energy minimization calculation with a measure of slip included. The effect of slip on the calculated flow-field is used to show how the apparent extensional viscosity compares with the true extensional viscosity. In particular, it was found that the apparent planar extensional viscosity would be difficult to determine reliably at either low or high Weissenberg numbers but could be distinguished to some extent at moderate Weissenberg numbers between 0.25 and 1. It was also shown, however, that an unknown extent of slip at the vortex boundary would cause an uncertainty of a factor of 2 in any apparent measure of rheological properties.

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