On their own terms: Six Citizen-Soldiers’ Experiences of Military Culture in the Second Australian Imperial Force and the United States Army in the Second World War

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

94 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Using biographical case studies, this research examines how six citizen-soldiers from the United States Army and the Second Australian Imperial Force experienced life in the military in World War II. It uses the theories of Erving Goffman, Michel Foucault, and Judith Butler to explore how soldier beliefs, values, and attitudes intersected with military cultures to shape their experiences. While each recruit's respective army tried to suppress their pre-existing civilian identities, each soldier negotiated the relationship with the respective armies differently, and this difference is evidenced in their behaviour and writing, shedding useful light on diverse soldiers' wartime experience.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Gaynor, Andrea, Supervisor
  • Blue, Ethan, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date30 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2020

Embargo information

  • Embargoed from 11/05/2021 to 31/07/2022. Made publicly available on 31/07/2022.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On their own terms: Six Citizen-Soldiers’ Experiences of Military Culture in the Second Australian Imperial Force and the United States Army in the Second World War'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this