Older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult female offspring

Jess Tearne, Monique Robinson, Peter Jacoby, Karina Allen, Nadia Cunningham, J. Li, Neil Mclean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

© 2015 American Psychological Association. The evidence regarding older parental age and incidence of mood disorder symptoms in offspring is limited, and that which exists is mixed. We sought to clarify these relationships by using data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. The Raine Study provided comprehensive data from 2,900 pregnancies, resulting in 2,868 live born children. A total of 1,220 participants completed the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) at the 20-year cohort follow-up. We used negative binomial regression analyses with log link and with adjustment for known perinatal risk factors to examine the extent to which maternal and paternal age at childbirth predicted continuous DASS-21 index scores. In the final multivariate models, a maternal age of 30-34 years was associated with significant increases in stress DASS-21 scores in female offspring relative to female offspring of 25-to 29-year-old mothers. A maternal age of 35 years and over was associated with increased scores on all DASS-21 scales in female offspring. Our results indicate that older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult females. Further research into the mechanisms underpinning this relationship is needed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume125
Issue number1
Early online date16 Nov 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

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Maternal Age
Adult Children
Young Adult
Anxiety
Depression
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Mood Disorders
Cohort Studies
Parents
Regression Analysis
Mothers
Parturition
Incidence
Research

Cite this

Tearne, Jess ; Robinson, Monique ; Jacoby, Peter ; Allen, Karina ; Cunningham, Nadia ; Li, J. ; Mclean, Neil. / Older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult female offspring. In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 2016 ; Vol. 125, No. 1. pp. 1-10.
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abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 American Psychological Association. The evidence regarding older parental age and incidence of mood disorder symptoms in offspring is limited, and that which exists is mixed. We sought to clarify these relationships by using data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. The Raine Study provided comprehensive data from 2,900 pregnancies, resulting in 2,868 live born children. A total of 1,220 participants completed the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21) at the 20-year cohort follow-up. We used negative binomial regression analyses with log link and with adjustment for known perinatal risk factors to examine the extent to which maternal and paternal age at childbirth predicted continuous DASS-21 index scores. In the final multivariate models, a maternal age of 30-34 years was associated with significant increases in stress DASS-21 scores in female offspring relative to female offspring of 25-to 29-year-old mothers. A maternal age of 35 years and over was associated with increased scores on all DASS-21 scales in female offspring. Our results indicate that older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult females. Further research into the mechanisms underpinning this relationship is needed.",
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Older maternal age is associated with depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms in young adult female offspring. / Tearne, Jess; Robinson, Monique; Jacoby, Peter; Allen, Karina; Cunningham, Nadia; Li, J.; Mclean, Neil.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 125, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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