Ocean transport pathways to a world heritage fringing coral reef: Ningaloo reef, Western Australia

Jiangtao Xu, Ryan Lowe, Gregory Ivey, Nicole Jones, Zhenlin Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. A Lagrangian particle tracking model driven by a regional ocean circulation model was used to investigate the seasonally varying connectivity patterns within the shelf circulation surrounding the 300 km long Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia (WA) during 2009-2010. Forward-in-time simulations revealed that surface water was transported equatorward and offshore in summer due to the upwelling-favorable winds. In winter, however, water was transported polewards down the WA coast due to the seasonally strong Leeuwin Current. Using backward-in-time simulations, the subsurface transport pathways revealed two main source regions of shelf water reaching Ningaloo Reef: (1) a year-round source to the northeast in the upper 100 m of water column; and (2) during the summer, an additional source offshore and to the west of Ningaloo in depths between ~30 and ~150 m. Transient winddriven coastal upwelling, onshore geostrophic transport and stirring by offshore eddies were identified as the important mechanisms influencing the source water origins. The identification of these highly time-dependent transport pathways and source water locations is an essential step towards quantifying how key material (e.g., nutrients, larvae, contaminants, etc.) is exchanged between Ningaloo Reef and the surrounding shelf ocean, and how this is mechanistically coupled to the complex ocean dynamics in this region.
Original languageEnglish
Article number e0145822
Pages (from-to)1-26
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jan 2016

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Coral Reefs
Western Australia
Reefs
Oceans and Seas
coral reefs
reefs
oceans
Water
water
summer
Surface waters
Nutrients
Coastal zones
Licensure
surface water
Reproduction
Larva
Impurities
coasts
winter

Cite this

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title = "Ocean transport pathways to a world heritage fringing coral reef: Ningaloo reef, Western Australia",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Xu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. A Lagrangian particle tracking model driven by a regional ocean circulation model was used to investigate the seasonally varying connectivity patterns within the shelf circulation surrounding the 300 km long Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia (WA) during 2009-2010. Forward-in-time simulations revealed that surface water was transported equatorward and offshore in summer due to the upwelling-favorable winds. In winter, however, water was transported polewards down the WA coast due to the seasonally strong Leeuwin Current. Using backward-in-time simulations, the subsurface transport pathways revealed two main source regions of shelf water reaching Ningaloo Reef: (1) a year-round source to the northeast in the upper 100 m of water column; and (2) during the summer, an additional source offshore and to the west of Ningaloo in depths between ~30 and ~150 m. Transient winddriven coastal upwelling, onshore geostrophic transport and stirring by offshore eddies were identified as the important mechanisms influencing the source water origins. The identification of these highly time-dependent transport pathways and source water locations is an essential step towards quantifying how key material (e.g., nutrients, larvae, contaminants, etc.) is exchanged between Ningaloo Reef and the surrounding shelf ocean, and how this is mechanistically coupled to the complex ocean dynamics in this region.",
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Ocean transport pathways to a world heritage fringing coral reef: Ningaloo reef, Western Australia. / Xu, Jiangtao; Lowe, Ryan; Ivey, Gregory; Jones, Nicole; Zhang, Zhenlin.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 1, e0145822, 20.01.2016, p. 1-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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