Ocean-structure-seabed interaction: O-tube modelling of pipeline stability

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Abstract

A key facility used by researchers in the Centre for Geotechnical Science and Engineering is the set of O-tube flumes established at UWA. These flumes are a unique concept that have been developed at UWA to allow simulation of ocean-structure-seabed interactions using realistic metocean and geotechnical conditions. The large, small and mini 0-tube flumes allow seabed flows to be simulated at a range of scales, including full scale modelling of small subsea pipelines. Interactions between mobile sediments and infrastructure can be monitored. This paper describes the O-tube facilities and uses example results to illustrate the range of problems that can be tackled. A key outcome from the 0-tube research program has been a new methodology to assess the stability of pipelines on mobile seabeds, which is a common design requirement offshore Australia. This methodology is allowing more efficient and cost-effective design of the pipelines that are the vital arteries of Australia's offshore oil and gas infrastructure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)157-164
JournalAustralian Geomechanics Journal
Volume49
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Ocean structures
Pipelines
ocean
infrastructure
modeling
methodology
research program
Sediments
engineering
oil
Gases
gas
cost
sediment
simulation
Costs

Cite this

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title = "Ocean-structure-seabed interaction: O-tube modelling of pipeline stability",
abstract = "A key facility used by researchers in the Centre for Geotechnical Science and Engineering is the set of O-tube flumes established at UWA. These flumes are a unique concept that have been developed at UWA to allow simulation of ocean-structure-seabed interactions using realistic metocean and geotechnical conditions. The large, small and mini 0-tube flumes allow seabed flows to be simulated at a range of scales, including full scale modelling of small subsea pipelines. Interactions between mobile sediments and infrastructure can be monitored. This paper describes the O-tube facilities and uses example results to illustrate the range of problems that can be tackled. A key outcome from the 0-tube research program has been a new methodology to assess the stability of pipelines on mobile seabeds, which is a common design requirement offshore Australia. This methodology is allowing more efficient and cost-effective design of the pipelines that are the vital arteries of Australia's offshore oil and gas infrastructure.",
author = "David White and Scott Draper and Liang Cheng and Hongwei An and H. Mohr and Simon Leckie",
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AU - Draper, Scott

AU - Cheng, Liang

AU - An, Hongwei

AU - Mohr, H.

AU - Leckie, Simon

PY - 2015

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AB - A key facility used by researchers in the Centre for Geotechnical Science and Engineering is the set of O-tube flumes established at UWA. These flumes are a unique concept that have been developed at UWA to allow simulation of ocean-structure-seabed interactions using realistic metocean and geotechnical conditions. The large, small and mini 0-tube flumes allow seabed flows to be simulated at a range of scales, including full scale modelling of small subsea pipelines. Interactions between mobile sediments and infrastructure can be monitored. This paper describes the O-tube facilities and uses example results to illustrate the range of problems that can be tackled. A key outcome from the 0-tube research program has been a new methodology to assess the stability of pipelines on mobile seabeds, which is a common design requirement offshore Australia. This methodology is allowing more efficient and cost-effective design of the pipelines that are the vital arteries of Australia's offshore oil and gas infrastructure.

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