Occurrence of CYP1B1 mutations in juvenile open-angle glaucoma with advanced visual field loss

E. Souzeau, M. Hayes, T. Zhou, O.M. Siggs, B. Ridge, M.S. Awadalla, J.E.H. Smith, J.B. Ruddle, J.E. Elder, David Mackey, Alex Hewitt, P.R. Healey, I. Goldberg, William Morgan, J. Landers, A. Dubowsky, K.P. Burdon, J.E. Craig

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20 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. IMPORTANCE: Juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) is a severe neurodegenerative eye disorder in which most of the genetic contribution remains unexplained. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of pathogenic CYP1B1 sequence variants in an Australian cohort of patients with JOAG and severe visual field loss. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: For this cohort study, we recruited 160 patients with JOAG classified as advanced (n = 118) and nonadvanced (n = 42) through the Australian and New Zealand Registry of Advanced Glaucoma from January 1, 2007, through April 1, 2014. Eighty individuals with no evidence of glaucoma served as a control group. We defined JOAG as diagnosis before age 40 years and advanced JOAG as visual field loss in 2 of the 4 central fixation squares on a reliable visual field test result. We performed direct sequencing of the entire coding region of CYP1B1. Data analysis was performed in October 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Identification and characterization of CYP1B1 sequence variants. RESULTS: We identified 7 different pathogenic variants among 8 of 118 patients with advanced JOAG (6.8%) but none among the patients with nonadvanced JOAG. Three patients were homozygous or compound heterozygous for CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, which provided a likely basis for their disease. Five patients were heterozygous. The allele frequency among the patients with advanced JOAG (11 in 236 [4.7%]) was higher than among our controls (1 in 160 [0.6%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 7.8 [95% CI, 0.02-1.0]) or among the control population from the Exome Aggregation Consortium database (2946 of 122 960 [2.4%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 2.0 [95% CI, 0.3-0.9]). Individuals with CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, whether heterozygous or homozygous, had worse mean (SD) deviation on visual fields (-24.5 [5.1] [95% CI, -31.8 to -17.2] vs -15.6 [10.0] [95% CI, -17.1 to -13.6] dB; F1,126 = 5.90; P = .02; partial ηp2 = 0.05) and were younger at diagnosis (mean [SD] age, 23.1 [8.4] [95% CI, 17.2-29.1] vs 31.5 [8.0] [95% CI, 30.1-33.0] years; F1,122 = 7.18; P = .008; ηp2 = 0.06) than patients without CYP1B1 pathogenic variants. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with advanced JOAG based on visual field loss had enrichment of CYP1B1 pathogenic variants and a more severe phenotype compared with unaffected controls and patients with nonadvanced JOAG.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)826-833
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA Ophthalmology
Volume133
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015

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