Nucleoplasmic reticulum formation in human endometrial cells is steroid hormone responsive and recruits nascent components

Lior Pytowski, Marek M. Drozdz, Haibo Jiang, Zayra Hernandez, Kurun Kumar, Emily Knott, David J. Vaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The nuclei of cells may exhibit invaginations of the nuclear envelope under a variety of conditions. These invaginations form a branched network termed the nucleoplasmic reticulum (NR), which may be found in cells in pathological and physiological conditions. While an extensive NR is a hallmark of cellular senescence and shows associations with some cancers, very little is known about the formation of NR in physiological conditions, despite the presence of extensive nuclear invaginations in some cell types such as endometrial cells. Here we show that in these cells the NR is formed in response to reproductive hormones. We demonstrate that oestrogen and progesterone are sufficient to induce NR formation and that this process is reversible without cell division upon removal of the hormonal stimulus. Nascent lamins and phospholipids are incorporated into the invaginations suggesting that there is a dedicated machinery for its formation. The induction of NR in endometrial cells offers a new model to study NR formation and function in physiological conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5839
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume20
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nucleoplasmic reticulum formation in human endometrial cells is steroid hormone responsive and recruits nascent components'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this