No evidence for impaired humoral immunity to pneumococcal proteins in Australian Aboriginal children with otitis media

Ruth B. Thornton, Lea-Ann S. Kirkham, Karli J. Corscadden, Harvey L. Coates, Shyan Vijayasekaran, Jessica Hillwood, Sophie Toster, Phillipa Edminston, Guicheng Zhang, Anthony Keil, Peter C. Richmond

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The Australian Aboriginal population experiences disproportionately high rates of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the main pathogens responsible for OM and currently no vaccine offering cross strain protection exists. Vaccines consisting of conserved antigens to S. pneumoniae may reduce the burden of OM in high-risk populations; however no data exists examining naturally acquired antibody in Aboriginal children with OM. Methods Serum and salivary IgA and IgG were measured against the S. pneumoniae antigens PspA1 and 2, CbpA and Ply in a cross sectional study of 183 children, including 36 non-Aboriginal healthy control children and 70 Aboriginal children and 77 non-Aboriginal children undergoing surgery for OM using a multiplex bead assay. Results Significant differences were observed between the 3 groups for serum anti-PspA1 IgA, anti-CbpA and anti-Ply IgG and for all salivary antibodies assessed. Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher antibody titres than non-Aboriginal healthy children with no history of OM and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM for several proteins in serum and saliva. Non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher salivary anti-PspA1 IgG than healthy children, while all other titres were comparable between the groups. Conclusions Conserved vaccine candidate proteins from S. pneumoniae induce serum and salivary antibody responses in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM. Aboriginal children do not have an impaired antibody response to the antigens measured from S. pneumoniae and they may represent vaccine candidates in Indigenous populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-125
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
Volume92
Early online date22 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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Otitis Media
Humoral Immunity
Proteins
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Vaccines
Antigens
Antibody Formation
Antibodies
Serum
Cross Protection
Protein S
Saliva
Population Groups
Immunoglobulin A
Population
Blood Proteins
Pneumonia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Immunoglobulin G

Cite this

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title = "No evidence for impaired humoral immunity to pneumococcal proteins in Australian Aboriginal children with otitis media",
abstract = "Background The Australian Aboriginal population experiences disproportionately high rates of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the main pathogens responsible for OM and currently no vaccine offering cross strain protection exists. Vaccines consisting of conserved antigens to S. pneumoniae may reduce the burden of OM in high-risk populations; however no data exists examining naturally acquired antibody in Aboriginal children with OM. Methods Serum and salivary IgA and IgG were measured against the S. pneumoniae antigens PspA1 and 2, CbpA and Ply in a cross sectional study of 183 children, including 36 non-Aboriginal healthy control children and 70 Aboriginal children and 77 non-Aboriginal children undergoing surgery for OM using a multiplex bead assay. Results Significant differences were observed between the 3 groups for serum anti-PspA1 IgA, anti-CbpA and anti-Ply IgG and for all salivary antibodies assessed. Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher antibody titres than non-Aboriginal healthy children with no history of OM and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM for several proteins in serum and saliva. Non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher salivary anti-PspA1 IgG than healthy children, while all other titres were comparable between the groups. Conclusions Conserved vaccine candidate proteins from S. pneumoniae induce serum and salivary antibody responses in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM. Aboriginal children do not have an impaired antibody response to the antigens measured from S. pneumoniae and they may represent vaccine candidates in Indigenous populations.",
keywords = "Antibody responses, Australian Aboriginal, Immune response, Indigenous, Otitis media, Streptococcus pneumoniae",
author = "Thornton, {Ruth B.} and Kirkham, {Lea-Ann S.} and Corscadden, {Karli J.} and Coates, {Harvey L.} and Shyan Vijayasekaran and Jessica Hillwood and Sophie Toster and Phillipa Edminston and Guicheng Zhang and Anthony Keil and Richmond, {Peter C.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.019",
language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "119--125",
journal = "International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - No evidence for impaired humoral immunity to pneumococcal proteins in Australian Aboriginal children with otitis media

AU - Thornton, Ruth B.

AU - Kirkham, Lea-Ann S.

AU - Corscadden, Karli J.

AU - Coates, Harvey L.

AU - Vijayasekaran, Shyan

AU - Hillwood, Jessica

AU - Toster, Sophie

AU - Edminston, Phillipa

AU - Zhang, Guicheng

AU - Keil, Anthony

AU - Richmond, Peter C.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background The Australian Aboriginal population experiences disproportionately high rates of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the main pathogens responsible for OM and currently no vaccine offering cross strain protection exists. Vaccines consisting of conserved antigens to S. pneumoniae may reduce the burden of OM in high-risk populations; however no data exists examining naturally acquired antibody in Aboriginal children with OM. Methods Serum and salivary IgA and IgG were measured against the S. pneumoniae antigens PspA1 and 2, CbpA and Ply in a cross sectional study of 183 children, including 36 non-Aboriginal healthy control children and 70 Aboriginal children and 77 non-Aboriginal children undergoing surgery for OM using a multiplex bead assay. Results Significant differences were observed between the 3 groups for serum anti-PspA1 IgA, anti-CbpA and anti-Ply IgG and for all salivary antibodies assessed. Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher antibody titres than non-Aboriginal healthy children with no history of OM and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM for several proteins in serum and saliva. Non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher salivary anti-PspA1 IgG than healthy children, while all other titres were comparable between the groups. Conclusions Conserved vaccine candidate proteins from S. pneumoniae induce serum and salivary antibody responses in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM. Aboriginal children do not have an impaired antibody response to the antigens measured from S. pneumoniae and they may represent vaccine candidates in Indigenous populations.

AB - Background The Australian Aboriginal population experiences disproportionately high rates of otitis media (OM). Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the main pathogens responsible for OM and currently no vaccine offering cross strain protection exists. Vaccines consisting of conserved antigens to S. pneumoniae may reduce the burden of OM in high-risk populations; however no data exists examining naturally acquired antibody in Aboriginal children with OM. Methods Serum and salivary IgA and IgG were measured against the S. pneumoniae antigens PspA1 and 2, CbpA and Ply in a cross sectional study of 183 children, including 36 non-Aboriginal healthy control children and 70 Aboriginal children and 77 non-Aboriginal children undergoing surgery for OM using a multiplex bead assay. Results Significant differences were observed between the 3 groups for serum anti-PspA1 IgA, anti-CbpA and anti-Ply IgG and for all salivary antibodies assessed. Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher antibody titres than non-Aboriginal healthy children with no history of OM and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM for several proteins in serum and saliva. Non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM had significantly higher salivary anti-PspA1 IgG than healthy children, while all other titres were comparable between the groups. Conclusions Conserved vaccine candidate proteins from S. pneumoniae induce serum and salivary antibody responses in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children with a history of OM. Aboriginal children do not have an impaired antibody response to the antigens measured from S. pneumoniae and they may represent vaccine candidates in Indigenous populations.

KW - Antibody responses

KW - Australian Aboriginal

KW - Immune response

KW - Indigenous

KW - Otitis media

KW - Streptococcus pneumoniae

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U2 - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.019

DO - 10.1016/j.ijporl.2016.11.019

M3 - Article

VL - 92

SP - 119

EP - 125

JO - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

JF - International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology

SN - 0165-5876

ER -