Neurodevelopmental outcomes after initial childhood anesthetic exposure between ages 3 and 10 years

C. Ing, C.J. Di Maggio, Andrew Whitehouse, M.K. Hegarty, M. Sun, Britta Van Ungern-Sternberg, A.J. Davidson, M.M. Wall, G. Li, L. Sun

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paperpeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Copyright © 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Introduction: Epidemiologic studies examining the association between anesthetic exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes have primarily focused on exposures occurring under 3 years of age. In this study, we assess outcomes associated with initial anesthetic exposure occurring between 3 and 10 years of age. Methods: We used data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study to examine the risk of cognitive deficit at age 10 in children with initial anesthetic exposure between 3 and 5 years and between 5 and 10 years of age compared with children unexposed at those ages. The cohort included 2868 children born from 1989 to 1992 evaluated using a range of neuropsychological tests. A modified multivariable Poisson regression model was used to determine the adjusted association of initial anesthetic exposure in each age group with outcomes. Results: Exposed and unexposed children were found to have similar neuropsychological test results except for the McCarron Assessment of Neuromuscular Development (MAND) motor function scores. Even after adjusting for demographic and comorbidity differences, children exposed to anesthesia had a higher risk of motor deficit after initial exposure between ages 3 and 5 years (adjusted risk ratio, 2.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.42-3.79) and between 5 and 10 years (adjusted risk ratio, 2.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-4.48) compared with unexposed children. Conclusions: Initial exposure to anesthesia after age 3 had no measurable effects on language or cognitive function. Decreased motor function was found in children initially exposed after age 3 even after accounting for comorbid illness and injury history. These results suggest that there may be distinct windows of vulnerability for different neurodevelopmental domains in children.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationJournal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
Pages377-386
Volume26
ISBN (Print)08984921
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event4th Pediatric Anesthesia and Neuro-Development Assessment (PANDA) Symposium on Anesthesia and Neurodevelopment in Children - Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York, New York City, United States
Duration: 12 Apr 201412 Apr 2014
Conference number: 4

Conference

Conference4th Pediatric Anesthesia and Neuro-Development Assessment (PANDA) Symposium on Anesthesia and Neurodevelopment in Children
Abbreviated titlePANDA2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityNew York City
Period12/04/1412/04/14

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