Neighbourhood disadvantage and smoking: Examining the role of neighbourhood-level psychosocial characteristics

J.N. Rachele, Lisa Wood, A. Nathan, K. Giskes, G. Turrell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Purpose: This study aims to determine if neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics contribute to inequalities in smoking among residents from neighbourhoods of differing socioeconomic disadvantage. Methods: This cross-sectional study includes 11,035 residents from 200 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia in 2007. Self-reported measures were obtained for smoking and neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics (perceptions of incivilities, crime and safety, and social cohesion). Neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage was measured using a census-derived index. Data were analysed using multilevel logistic regression random intercept models. Results: Smoking was associated with neighbourhood disadvantage; this relationship remained after adjustment for individual-level socioeconomic position. Area-level perceptions of crime and safety and social cohesion were not independently associated with smoking, and did not explain the higher prevalence of smoking in disadvantaged areas; however, perceptions of incivilities showed an independent effect. Conclusions: Some neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics seem to contribute to the higher rates of smoking in disadvantaged areas.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)98-105
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume40
Early online date23 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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smoking
Smoking
social cohesion
Vulnerable Populations
crime
Crime
cohesion
offense
resident
safety
Safety
socioeconomic position
Censuses
cross-sectional study
census
logistics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
regression
socioeconomics

Cite this

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title = "Neighbourhood disadvantage and smoking: Examining the role of neighbourhood-level psychosocial characteristics",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Purpose: This study aims to determine if neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics contribute to inequalities in smoking among residents from neighbourhoods of differing socioeconomic disadvantage. Methods: This cross-sectional study includes 11,035 residents from 200 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia in 2007. Self-reported measures were obtained for smoking and neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics (perceptions of incivilities, crime and safety, and social cohesion). Neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage was measured using a census-derived index. Data were analysed using multilevel logistic regression random intercept models. Results: Smoking was associated with neighbourhood disadvantage; this relationship remained after adjustment for individual-level socioeconomic position. Area-level perceptions of crime and safety and social cohesion were not independently associated with smoking, and did not explain the higher prevalence of smoking in disadvantaged areas; however, perceptions of incivilities showed an independent effect. Conclusions: Some neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics seem to contribute to the higher rates of smoking in disadvantaged areas.",
author = "J.N. Rachele and Lisa Wood and A. Nathan and K. Giskes and G. Turrell",
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Neighbourhood disadvantage and smoking: Examining the role of neighbourhood-level psychosocial characteristics. / Rachele, J.N.; Wood, Lisa; Nathan, A.; Giskes, K.; Turrell, G.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 40, 07.2016, p. 98-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neighbourhood disadvantage and smoking: Examining the role of neighbourhood-level psychosocial characteristics

AU - Rachele, J.N.

AU - Wood, Lisa

AU - Nathan, A.

AU - Giskes, K.

AU - Turrell, G.

PY - 2016/7

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AB - © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Purpose: This study aims to determine if neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics contribute to inequalities in smoking among residents from neighbourhoods of differing socioeconomic disadvantage. Methods: This cross-sectional study includes 11,035 residents from 200 neighbourhoods in Brisbane, Australia in 2007. Self-reported measures were obtained for smoking and neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics (perceptions of incivilities, crime and safety, and social cohesion). Neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage was measured using a census-derived index. Data were analysed using multilevel logistic regression random intercept models. Results: Smoking was associated with neighbourhood disadvantage; this relationship remained after adjustment for individual-level socioeconomic position. Area-level perceptions of crime and safety and social cohesion were not independently associated with smoking, and did not explain the higher prevalence of smoking in disadvantaged areas; however, perceptions of incivilities showed an independent effect. Conclusions: Some neighbourhood psychosocial characteristics seem to contribute to the higher rates of smoking in disadvantaged areas.

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