Navigating Novelty and Risk in Resilience Management

Joan Dudney, Richard J. Hobbs, Robert Heilmayr, John J. Battles, Katharine N. Suding

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Resilience theory is increasingly applied to the management of global change impacts. There is growing concern, however, that misapplications of resilience-based management (RBM) can sometimes lead to undesirable outcomes. We address here an inescapable conundrum in the application of resilience theory: systems will need to track environmental change, but management that aims to support adaptive capacity can introduce undesirable levels of change. We provide a framework that links concepts from novel ecosystems and resilience theory to inform management of ecosystem change. We highlight that resilience-based applications need to address risks associated with novel human impacts to improve management outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)863-873
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume33
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

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ecosystem management
global change
ecosystem
anthropogenic activities
anthropogenic effect
environmental change
ecosystems
systems theory

Cite this

Dudney, Joan ; Hobbs, Richard J. ; Heilmayr, Robert ; Battles, John J. ; Suding, Katharine N. / Navigating Novelty and Risk in Resilience Management. In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution. 2018 ; Vol. 33, No. 11. pp. 863-873.
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Navigating Novelty and Risk in Resilience Management. / Dudney, Joan; Hobbs, Richard J.; Heilmayr, Robert; Battles, John J.; Suding, Katharine N.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 33, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 863-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Navigating Novelty and Risk in Resilience Management

AU - Dudney, Joan

AU - Hobbs, Richard J.

AU - Heilmayr, Robert

AU - Battles, John J.

AU - Suding, Katharine N.

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KW - adaptive capacity

KW - conservation

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