Native vs exotic: cultural discourses about flora, fauna and belonging in Australia

David Trigger, Jane Mulcock

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

Environmental debates about which plant and animal species ‘belong’ in particular locations have a growing significance around the world. We argue that ideas about which species constitute weeds or pests and how those species should be managed can be strongly grounded in cultural values and beliefs. Such beliefs are often linked, directly and indirectly, to everyday assumptions about national, regional, local and personal identities. Strong emotional attachments to particular species or landscapes can shape individual and community responses to flora and fauna with implications for issues of sustainable development and planning. This paper focuses on beliefs and practices that are thereby of relevance to urban environmental management.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2nd International Conference on Sustainable Planning and Development
EditorsC.A. Brebbia, A. Kungolos, E. Benatos
Place of PublicationSouthampton, UK
PublisherWessex Institute of Technology Press
Pages1301-1310
Number of pages10
Volume2
EditionBologna, Italy
ISBN (Print)184564025X, 9781853129858
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005
EventNative vs exotic: cultural discourses about flora, fauna and belonging in Australia - Bologna, Italy
Duration: 1 Jan 2005 → …

Conference

ConferenceNative vs exotic: cultural discourses about flora, fauna and belonging in Australia
Period1/01/05 → …

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