N and P colimitation of N2-fixing and N-supplied fynbos legumes from the Cape Floristic Region

P.M. Maistry, Michael Cramer, S.B.M. Chimphango

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background and aims: Legume species in the fynbos vegetation of the Cape Floristic Region, that fix N2 in soils with low P, may have evolved for enhanced acquisition and efficient use of P. It was hypothesized that N2-fixing and combined-N supplied (N-supplied) A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides are adapted to low P and would be relatively unresponsive to increased P of 100 μM. Methods: 18 legume species were evaluated for their nodulation response to low P availability. The N X P interaction was then examined in A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides reliant on either N2-fixation or 300 μM N (NH4NO3), and receiving 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 μM P (NaH2PO4). Results: In the species selection experiment, A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides, with the greatest nodule fresh weight (FW) and nodule FW to root FW ratio, were the most prolific nodulating species. In the N X P experiment, with low P supply, the biomass of N2-fixing P. calyptrata and C. genistoides was consistently greater than that of N-supplied plants. In contrast, with high P supply of 100 μM P, all N-supplied plants accumulated more biomass than the corresponding N2-fixing plants. High P-use efficiency, poor down-regulation of P uptake and P storage was evident in A. linearis and P. calyptrata. Conclusion: The growth response to P and the significant N X P interactions indicate that N2-fixing and N-supplied plants were not adapted to low P, but rather colimited by both N and P. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)217-228
    JournalPlant and Soil
    Volume373
    Issue number1-2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Cape Floristic Region
    fynbos
    legumes
    nodulation
    biomass
    growth response
    fixation
    experiment
    uptake mechanisms
    vegetation
    soil

    Cite this

    @article{65de774894b54437ae21c14e87bcbdb5,
    title = "N and P colimitation of N2-fixing and N-supplied fynbos legumes from the Cape Floristic Region",
    abstract = "Background and aims: Legume species in the fynbos vegetation of the Cape Floristic Region, that fix N2 in soils with low P, may have evolved for enhanced acquisition and efficient use of P. It was hypothesized that N2-fixing and combined-N supplied (N-supplied) A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides are adapted to low P and would be relatively unresponsive to increased P of 100 μM. Methods: 18 legume species were evaluated for their nodulation response to low P availability. The N X P interaction was then examined in A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides reliant on either N2-fixation or 300 μM N (NH4NO3), and receiving 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 μM P (NaH2PO4). Results: In the species selection experiment, A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides, with the greatest nodule fresh weight (FW) and nodule FW to root FW ratio, were the most prolific nodulating species. In the N X P experiment, with low P supply, the biomass of N2-fixing P. calyptrata and C. genistoides was consistently greater than that of N-supplied plants. In contrast, with high P supply of 100 μM P, all N-supplied plants accumulated more biomass than the corresponding N2-fixing plants. High P-use efficiency, poor down-regulation of P uptake and P storage was evident in A. linearis and P. calyptrata. Conclusion: The growth response to P and the significant N X P interactions indicate that N2-fixing and N-supplied plants were not adapted to low P, but rather colimited by both N and P. {\circledC} 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.",
    author = "P.M. Maistry and Michael Cramer and S.B.M. Chimphango",
    year = "2013",
    doi = "10.1007/s11104-013-1793-y",
    language = "English",
    volume = "373",
    pages = "217--228",
    journal = "Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships",
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    number = "1-2",

    }

    N and P colimitation of N2-fixing and N-supplied fynbos legumes from the Cape Floristic Region. / Maistry, P.M.; Cramer, Michael; Chimphango, S.B.M.

    In: Plant and Soil, Vol. 373, No. 1-2, 2013, p. 217-228.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - N and P colimitation of N2-fixing and N-supplied fynbos legumes from the Cape Floristic Region

    AU - Maistry, P.M.

    AU - Cramer, Michael

    AU - Chimphango, S.B.M.

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Background and aims: Legume species in the fynbos vegetation of the Cape Floristic Region, that fix N2 in soils with low P, may have evolved for enhanced acquisition and efficient use of P. It was hypothesized that N2-fixing and combined-N supplied (N-supplied) A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides are adapted to low P and would be relatively unresponsive to increased P of 100 μM. Methods: 18 legume species were evaluated for their nodulation response to low P availability. The N X P interaction was then examined in A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides reliant on either N2-fixation or 300 μM N (NH4NO3), and receiving 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 μM P (NaH2PO4). Results: In the species selection experiment, A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides, with the greatest nodule fresh weight (FW) and nodule FW to root FW ratio, were the most prolific nodulating species. In the N X P experiment, with low P supply, the biomass of N2-fixing P. calyptrata and C. genistoides was consistently greater than that of N-supplied plants. In contrast, with high P supply of 100 μM P, all N-supplied plants accumulated more biomass than the corresponding N2-fixing plants. High P-use efficiency, poor down-regulation of P uptake and P storage was evident in A. linearis and P. calyptrata. Conclusion: The growth response to P and the significant N X P interactions indicate that N2-fixing and N-supplied plants were not adapted to low P, but rather colimited by both N and P. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

    AB - Background and aims: Legume species in the fynbos vegetation of the Cape Floristic Region, that fix N2 in soils with low P, may have evolved for enhanced acquisition and efficient use of P. It was hypothesized that N2-fixing and combined-N supplied (N-supplied) A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides are adapted to low P and would be relatively unresponsive to increased P of 100 μM. Methods: 18 legume species were evaluated for their nodulation response to low P availability. The N X P interaction was then examined in A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides reliant on either N2-fixation or 300 μM N (NH4NO3), and receiving 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 μM P (NaH2PO4). Results: In the species selection experiment, A. linearis, P. calyptrata and C. genistoides, with the greatest nodule fresh weight (FW) and nodule FW to root FW ratio, were the most prolific nodulating species. In the N X P experiment, with low P supply, the biomass of N2-fixing P. calyptrata and C. genistoides was consistently greater than that of N-supplied plants. In contrast, with high P supply of 100 μM P, all N-supplied plants accumulated more biomass than the corresponding N2-fixing plants. High P-use efficiency, poor down-regulation of P uptake and P storage was evident in A. linearis and P. calyptrata. Conclusion: The growth response to P and the significant N X P interactions indicate that N2-fixing and N-supplied plants were not adapted to low P, but rather colimited by both N and P. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

    U2 - 10.1007/s11104-013-1793-y

    DO - 10.1007/s11104-013-1793-y

    M3 - Article

    VL - 373

    SP - 217

    EP - 228

    JO - Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships

    JF - Plant and Soil: An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships

    SN - 0032-079X

    IS - 1-2

    ER -