Murujuga desert, tide, and dreaming: Understanding early rock art production and lifeways in northwest Australia

Megan Berry

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This research presents findings from a stylistic, spatial, and archaeological analyses of rock art on Murujuga (the Dampier Archipelago) from the Pleistocene to the Early Holocene. The aim is to understand how early cultural life-ways are mirrored in the associated early rock art phases on Murujuga; and to investigate the impetus for shifting social geographies during periods of extreme environmental and social pressure. Significantly, the analyses indicate the potential for a robust late Pleistocene and early Holocene Murujuga rock art corpus and it is argued that rock art production was mobilized within the natural and social landscape to mitigate and map onto the changing landscape.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • McDonald, Jo, Supervisor
  • Veth, Peter, Supervisor
  • Smith, Benjamin, Supervisor
  • Mulvaney, Ken, Supervisor
Award date17 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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rock art
tide
desert
Holocene
Pleistocene
archipelago

Cite this

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