Multidisciplinary team briefings: A way forward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

There is an ever-growing reliance on teamwork within health care. Despite the advantages of teamwork in delivering specialised patient care, teamwork also requires increased communication and explicit coordination — areas ripe with the potential for error Indeed, research in operating theatres has repeatedly found that poor teamwork has been associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality.

There has been a plethora of interventions designed to improve teamwork in operating theatres, yet “[t]here is little evidence
that much progress has been achieved in reducing or preventing errors”. As such, we have set out to empirically test a novel approach to improving teamwork, reducing error and making theatres more efficient. In this article we briefly introduce the concept of “multidisciplinary team briefings”. We will then present our model for high-quality multidisciplinary team briefings. Finally, we provide two recommendations for getting colleagues and other medical practitioners on-board.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-14
JournalDay Surgery Australia
Volume14
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2015

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Patient Care
Communication
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Mortality
Research

Cite this

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Multidisciplinary team briefings : A way forward. / Carpini, Joseph Alexander; Flemming, Adrian; Parker, Sharon.

In: Day Surgery Australia, Vol. 14, No. 2, 08.2015, p. 12-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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