Motherhood after migration: perinatal health and wellbeing among culturally and linguistically diverse foreign-born women in Western Australia

Brilliana von Katterfeld

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

637 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

[Truncated abstract] Approximately a quarter of the women who currently give birth in Australia were born overseas, and an increasing number are from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. Perinatal studies have noted significant variation in pregnancy complications, birth outcomes, and general perinatal health between local-born and foreign-born women and their infants. In some study outcomes foreign-born women have been shown to do as well as, or better than, their local-born counterparts while in others, foreign-born women are at a clear disadvantage. These outcomes also vary depending on the country of origin of the mother, indicating a high level of heterogeneity in the perinatal health of foreign-born women. Despite increasing cultural and linguistic diversity in the population, limited research has examined the pregnancy-related health of immigrant women in Australia, particularly in the state of Western Australia (WA). In light of the scarcity of information available on the perinatal health and wellbeing of foreign-born women in WA, this thesis investigates differences in pregnancy complications and obstetric interventions between foreign-born and Australian-born women. It also provides information on the pregnancy, birth, and early motherhood experiences of specific groups of foreign-born women in WA. The study which informed this thesis engaged both quantitative and qualitative methods.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Motherhood after migration: perinatal health and wellbeing among culturally and linguistically diverse foreign-born women in Western Australia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this