Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors

Shiao Huey Chow, Alex Verth, Lucia Zang, Jana Orszaghova, Rosemary Bradley, Hugh Wolgamot, Ryan Beemer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

This study investigated the response of a dynamically installed anchor as an integral part of a model scale wave energy system through a field trial performed in the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia. The field trial involved a cylindrical wave buoy, taut-moored by a steel spring and a stiff mooring line to a dynamically installed anchor in a soft soil site. The buoy-spring system was designed to resonate at approximately 1.15 Hz, which is within the high-frequency tail of a spectrum of typical wind generated waves in the Swan River. The dynamically installed anchor was a 37 kg slender cylinder with 60 degree cone tip, with a shaft diameter of 0.089 m and a total length of 0.88 m. In the field trial, the instrumented anchor was first installed by free-falling into the riverbed and found to embed to 2.5 times the anchor length. The anchor was then connected to the model wave buoy-spring system under taut-mooring, and subjected to wave loading before being pulled-out. The anchor was found to produce a pull-out capacity two times the dry anchor weight.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics
EditorsHugo Acosta-Martínez, Barry Lehane
Place of PublicationPerth
PublisherAustralian Geomechanics Society
Pages679-684
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9780994626103
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019
EventThe 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics - Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre, Perth, Australia
Duration: 1 Apr 20193 Apr 2019
Conference number: 13
https://geomechanics2019.com.au/

Conference

ConferenceThe 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics
CountryAustralia
CityPerth
Period1/04/193/04/19
Internet address

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wave energy
anchor
wind wave
soft soil
river
shaft
steel
trial

Cite this

Chow, S. H., Verth, A., Zang, L., Orszaghova, J., Bradley, R., Wolgamot, H., & Beemer, R. (2019). Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors. In H. Acosta-Martínez, & B. Lehane (Eds.), Proceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics (pp. 679-684). Perth: Australian Geomechanics Society.
Chow, Shiao Huey ; Verth, Alex ; Zang, Lucia ; Orszaghova, Jana ; Bradley, Rosemary ; Wolgamot, Hugh ; Beemer, Ryan. / Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors. Proceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics. editor / Hugo Acosta-Martínez ; Barry Lehane. Perth : Australian Geomechanics Society, 2019. pp. 679-684
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abstract = "This study investigated the response of a dynamically installed anchor as an integral part of a model scale wave energy system through a field trial performed in the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia. The field trial involved a cylindrical wave buoy, taut-moored by a steel spring and a stiff mooring line to a dynamically installed anchor in a soft soil site. The buoy-spring system was designed to resonate at approximately 1.15 Hz, which is within the high-frequency tail of a spectrum of typical wind generated waves in the Swan River. The dynamically installed anchor was a 37 kg slender cylinder with 60 degree cone tip, with a shaft diameter of 0.089 m and a total length of 0.88 m. In the field trial, the instrumented anchor was first installed by free-falling into the riverbed and found to embed to 2.5 times the anchor length. The anchor was then connected to the model wave buoy-spring system under taut-mooring, and subjected to wave loading before being pulled-out. The anchor was found to produce a pull-out capacity two times the dry anchor weight.",
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Chow, SH, Verth, A, Zang, L, Orszaghova, J, Bradley, R, Wolgamot, H & Beemer, R 2019, Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors. in H Acosta-Martínez & B Lehane (eds), Proceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics. Australian Geomechanics Society, Perth, pp. 679-684, The 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics, Perth, Australia, 1/04/19.

Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors. / Chow, Shiao Huey; Verth, Alex; Zang, Lucia; Orszaghova, Jana; Bradley, Rosemary ; Wolgamot, Hugh; Beemer, Ryan.

Proceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics. ed. / Hugo Acosta-Martínez; Barry Lehane. Perth : Australian Geomechanics Society, 2019. p. 679-684.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

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AU - Beemer, Ryan

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N2 - This study investigated the response of a dynamically installed anchor as an integral part of a model scale wave energy system through a field trial performed in the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia. The field trial involved a cylindrical wave buoy, taut-moored by a steel spring and a stiff mooring line to a dynamically installed anchor in a soft soil site. The buoy-spring system was designed to resonate at approximately 1.15 Hz, which is within the high-frequency tail of a spectrum of typical wind generated waves in the Swan River. The dynamically installed anchor was a 37 kg slender cylinder with 60 degree cone tip, with a shaft diameter of 0.089 m and a total length of 0.88 m. In the field trial, the instrumented anchor was first installed by free-falling into the riverbed and found to embed to 2.5 times the anchor length. The anchor was then connected to the model wave buoy-spring system under taut-mooring, and subjected to wave loading before being pulled-out. The anchor was found to produce a pull-out capacity two times the dry anchor weight.

AB - This study investigated the response of a dynamically installed anchor as an integral part of a model scale wave energy system through a field trial performed in the Swan River, Perth, Western Australia. The field trial involved a cylindrical wave buoy, taut-moored by a steel spring and a stiff mooring line to a dynamically installed anchor in a soft soil site. The buoy-spring system was designed to resonate at approximately 1.15 Hz, which is within the high-frequency tail of a spectrum of typical wind generated waves in the Swan River. The dynamically installed anchor was a 37 kg slender cylinder with 60 degree cone tip, with a shaft diameter of 0.089 m and a total length of 0.88 m. In the field trial, the instrumented anchor was first installed by free-falling into the riverbed and found to embed to 2.5 times the anchor length. The anchor was then connected to the model wave buoy-spring system under taut-mooring, and subjected to wave loading before being pulled-out. The anchor was found to produce a pull-out capacity two times the dry anchor weight.

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Chow SH, Verth A, Zang L, Orszaghova J, Bradley R, Wolgamot H et al. Mooring of wave energy system using dynamically installed anchors. In Acosta-Martínez H, Lehane B, editors, Proceedings of the 13th Australia New Zealand Conference on Geomechanics. Perth: Australian Geomechanics Society. 2019. p. 679-684