Mollusk microbiota shift during Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in the freshwater snail Biomphalaria glabrata and the terrestrial slug Phillocaulis soleiformis

Joana Borges Osório, Leandro de Mattos Pereira, Adriana Giongo, Letícia Marconatto, Jeremy Potriquet, Renata Russo Frasca Candido, Jason Mulvenna, Malcolm Jones, Carlos Graeff-Teixeira, Alessandra Loureiro Morassutti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the present work, we reported for the first time the microbiome from Phyllocaulis soleiformis and Biomphalaria glabrata assessed using high-throughput DNA sequencing pre- and post-infection with the helminth parasite Angiostrongylus cantonensis. B. glabrata and P. soleiformis were experimentally infected with A. cantonensis. Fecal DNAs from control and infected groups were extracted and subjected to 16S rRNA high-throughput sequencing survey. No significant differences were found in the alpha diversity indexes in Phyllocaulis and Biomphalaria experiments independently. PCoA analysis using the unweighted UniFrac measures showed that both microbiotas behaved differently depending on the host. In Biomphalaria microbiota, control and infected groups were significantly different (p = 0.0219), while Phyllocaulis samples were not (p = 0.5190). The microbiome of P. soleiformis infected with A. cantonensis showed a significant decrease of Sphingobacterium and a substantial increase of Cellvibrio when compared to a control group. The microbiome of B. glabrata infected with A. cantonensis showed a significant decline in the abundance of Flavobacterium, Fluviicola, Nitrospira, Vogesella and an OTU belonging to the family Comamonadaceae, and a significant increase of Uliginosibacterium and an OTU belonging to the family Weeksellaceae when compared to a control group. Overall, the microbiome data reported here provided valuable information with regard to the diversity of bacterial communities that comprise the gut microbiome of gastropods. Furthermore, we report here the effect of the infection of the helminth A. cantonensis in the ratio and distribution of the fecal microbiome of the snails. Further studies are highly valuable in order to better understand those interactions by comparing different microbiome profiles and mollusk models. By now, we anticipate that ecological studies will take significant advantage of these advances, particularly concerning improving our understanding of helminth-microbiome-host interactions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2495-2503
Number of pages9
JournalParasitology Research
Volume119
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2020

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