Molecular epidemiology and evolution of mosquito-borne flaviviruses and alphaviruses enzootic in Australia

J.S. Mackenzie, M. Poidinger, M.D. Lindsay, R.A. Hall, Leanne Sammels

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18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three distinct patterns in the molecular epidemiology and evolution are evident among the alphaviruses and flaviviruses enzootic in Australia. One pattern, exemplified by MVE and KUN viruses, is of a single genetic type evolving slowly and uniformly in geographically widely separated regions of Australia with no evidence of independent divergence. The second pattern, exemplified by RR virus, is of separate genotypes evolving in different geographic regions with significant nucleotide divergence between genotypes. The third pattern, exemplified by SIN virus, is of a succession of temporally related genotypes that extend over most of the Australian continent, with relatively low levels of nucleotide divergence within a genotype, and which are each replaced by the subsequent genotype. These patterns are associated in part due to the nature and dispersal of their vertebrate hosts. Nucleotide divergence rates for Australian alphaviruses are similar to those reported elsewhere. Genomic relationships between Australian flavivirus members of the JE virus serological complex and between Australian alphaviruses are discussed, and evidence is presented for a possible new genomic lineage of SIN virus.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-237
JournalVirus Genes
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

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