Moderate acute intake of de-alcoholised red wine, but not alcohol, is protective against radiation-induced DNA damage ex vivo - Results of a comparative in vivo intervention study in younger men

W. Greenrod, C.S. Stockley, Philip Burcham, M. Abbey, M. Fenech

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remainsunclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine.We thereforetested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress ina crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21–26 years. The participants adhered to a low plantphenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300mL of complete red wine, dealcoholised red wine or ethanol on separateoccasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiationinducedgenome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentrationwas measured. Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wineprotected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated withthe concentration of total plasma catechin (R =−0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction ofred wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin.© 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)290-301
    JournalMutation Research
    Volume591
    Issue number1/2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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    Wine
    DNA Damage
    Alcohols
    Radiation
    Catechin
    Genome
    Micronucleus Tests
    Cytokinesis
    Gamma Rays
    Beverages
    Insurance Benefits
    Cross-Over Studies
    Young Adult
    Oxidative Stress
    Ethanol
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Diet

    Cite this

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    title = "Moderate acute intake of de-alcoholised red wine, but not alcohol, is protective against radiation-induced DNA damage ex vivo - Results of a comparative in vivo intervention study in younger men",
    abstract = "Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remainsunclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine.We thereforetested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress ina crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21–26 years. The participants adhered to a low plantphenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300mL of complete red wine, dealcoholised red wine or ethanol on separateoccasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiationinducedgenome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentrationwas measured. Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1and 2 h post-consumption by 20{\%}. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wineprotected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated withthe concentration of total plasma catechin (R =−0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction ofred wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin.{\circledC} 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
    author = "W. Greenrod and C.S. Stockley and Philip Burcham and M. Abbey and M. Fenech",
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    AU - Abbey, M.

    AU - Fenech, M.

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    AB - Moderate intake of wine is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease and possibly cancer however it remainsunclear whether the potential health benefits of wine intake are due to alcohol or the non-alcoholic fraction of wine.We thereforetested the hypothesis that the non-alcoholic fraction of wine protects against genome damage induced by oxidative stress ina crossover intervention study involving six young adult males aged 21–26 years. The participants adhered to a low plantphenolic compound diet for 48 h prior to consuming 300mL of complete red wine, dealcoholised red wine or ethanol on separateoccasions 1 week apart. Blood samples were collected 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 h after beverage consumption. Baseline and radiationinducedgenome damage was measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay and total plasma catechin concentrationwas measured. Consumption of dealcoholised red wine significantly decreased the gamma radiation-induced DNA damage at 1and 2 h post-consumption by 20%. In contrast alcohol tended to increase radiation-induced genome damage and complete wineprotected against radiation-induced genome damage relative to alcohol. The observed effects were only weakly correlated withthe concentration of total plasma catechin (R =−0.23). These preliminary data suggest that only the non-alcoholic fraction ofred wine protects DNA from oxidative damage but this effect cannot be explained solely by plasma catechin.© 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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