Methods of Delivering Progress Feedback to Optimise Patient Outcomes: The Value of Expected Treatment Trajectories

Geoffrey R. Hooke, Adelln A H Sng, Nadia K. Cunningham, Andrew C. Page

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4 Citations (Scopus)
59 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Whilst feedback is demonstrated to improve therapy outcomes, little attention has been given to the relative benefits of the form in which feedback is given. The present study aimed to compare patients’ perceptions of feedback graphs with and without expected treatment response trajectories. In a counter-balanced design, patients in 2-week CBT programs were shown feedback graphs with and without expected symptom trajectories; and were asked to complete questionnaire regarding the appeal after viewing the first graphs. Patients (n = 42) viewed feedback graphs and preferred those with trajectories present and perceived the additional detail helpful to both themselves and their therapists. The present findings support the appeal for and potential usefulness of richer feedback for facilitating discussion and positive outcomes in therapy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-211
Number of pages8
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

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Methods of Delivering Progress Feedback to Optimise Patient Outcomes : The Value of Expected Treatment Trajectories. / Hooke, Geoffrey R.; Sng, Adelln A H; Cunningham, Nadia K.; Page, Andrew C.

In: Cognitive Therapy and Research, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.04.2018, p. 204-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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