Methods for Intraocular Lens Power Calculation in Cataract Surgery after Radial Keratotomy

Andrew M.J. Turnbull, Geoffrey J. Crawford, Graham D. Barrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To compare methods of calculating the required intraocular lens (IOL) power for patients undergoing cataract surgery after radial keratotomy (RK), including the 2016 update of the True K formula. Design: Retrospective case series. Participants: A total of 52 eyes of 34 patients who had sequential RK and cataract surgery performed in the same institution by 1 of 2 surgeons. Methods: Seven IOL calculation formulae were evaluated: True K [History], True K [Partial History], True K [No History], Double-K Holladay 1 (DK-Holladay-IOLM), Potvin-Hill, Haigis, and Haigis with a −0.50 diopter (D) offset. Biometry was obtained with the IOLMaster 500 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) and Pentacam (OCULUS Inc, Arlington, WA) devices. Subjective refraction was performed at 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. The achieved spherical equivalent outcome was compared with the target outcome to calculate the absolute error for each eye with each formula. Main Outcome Measures: Median absolute error (MedAE) and mean absolute error (MAE), and percentage of patients within ±0.50 D, ±0.75 D, and ±1.00 D of refractive target. Mean error (ME) was also calculated to demonstrate whether a formula tended toward more myopic or hyperopic outcomes. Results: Best results were achieved with the True K [History]. The MedAE was higher (0.382 vs. 0.275) with the True K [Partial History], but a similar percentage of patients (75.0%–76.6%) achieved within ±0.50 D of target. Of the methods that do not require refractive history, the True K [No History] and unadjusted Haigis were most accurate (69.2% within ±0.50 D of target), with the True K [No History] returning the lowest MedAE but also more of a tendency toward hyperopia (ME +0.269 vs. −0.006 for Haigis). The DK-Holladay-IOLM and Potvin-Hill methods were the least accurate. Conclusions: Knowledge of the refractive history significantly improves the accuracy of IOL calculations in patients undergoing cataract surgery after previous RK. The post-RK refraction appears to be the most important parameter, with inclusion of the pre-RK refraction offering a further slight improvement in MedAE. When no refractive history is available, the True K [No History] and Haigis formulae both perform well, with the added advantage of not requiring data from separate biometric devices.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOphthalmology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Aug 2019

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Radial Keratotomy
Intraocular Lenses
Cataract
History
Biometry
Hyperopia
Equipment and Supplies
Germany

Cite this

@article{20e716545525464d88418424dc5e5f72,
title = "Methods for Intraocular Lens Power Calculation in Cataract Surgery after Radial Keratotomy",
abstract = "Purpose: To compare methods of calculating the required intraocular lens (IOL) power for patients undergoing cataract surgery after radial keratotomy (RK), including the 2016 update of the True K formula. Design: Retrospective case series. Participants: A total of 52 eyes of 34 patients who had sequential RK and cataract surgery performed in the same institution by 1 of 2 surgeons. Methods: Seven IOL calculation formulae were evaluated: True K [History], True K [Partial History], True K [No History], Double-K Holladay 1 (DK-Holladay-IOLM), Potvin-Hill, Haigis, and Haigis with a −0.50 diopter (D) offset. Biometry was obtained with the IOLMaster 500 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) and Pentacam (OCULUS Inc, Arlington, WA) devices. Subjective refraction was performed at 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. The achieved spherical equivalent outcome was compared with the target outcome to calculate the absolute error for each eye with each formula. Main Outcome Measures: Median absolute error (MedAE) and mean absolute error (MAE), and percentage of patients within ±0.50 D, ±0.75 D, and ±1.00 D of refractive target. Mean error (ME) was also calculated to demonstrate whether a formula tended toward more myopic or hyperopic outcomes. Results: Best results were achieved with the True K [History]. The MedAE was higher (0.382 vs. 0.275) with the True K [Partial History], but a similar percentage of patients (75.0{\%}–76.6{\%}) achieved within ±0.50 D of target. Of the methods that do not require refractive history, the True K [No History] and unadjusted Haigis were most accurate (69.2{\%} within ±0.50 D of target), with the True K [No History] returning the lowest MedAE but also more of a tendency toward hyperopia (ME +0.269 vs. −0.006 for Haigis). The DK-Holladay-IOLM and Potvin-Hill methods were the least accurate. Conclusions: Knowledge of the refractive history significantly improves the accuracy of IOL calculations in patients undergoing cataract surgery after previous RK. The post-RK refraction appears to be the most important parameter, with inclusion of the pre-RK refraction offering a further slight improvement in MedAE. When no refractive history is available, the True K [No History] and Haigis formulae both perform well, with the added advantage of not requiring data from separate biometric devices.",
author = "Turnbull, {Andrew M.J.} and Crawford, {Geoffrey J.} and Barrett, {Graham D.}",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.08.019",
language = "English",
journal = "Ophthalmology: journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology",
issn = "0161-6420",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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Methods for Intraocular Lens Power Calculation in Cataract Surgery after Radial Keratotomy. / Turnbull, Andrew M.J.; Crawford, Geoffrey J.; Barrett, Graham D.

In: Ophthalmology, 23.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Methods for Intraocular Lens Power Calculation in Cataract Surgery after Radial Keratotomy

AU - Turnbull, Andrew M.J.

AU - Crawford, Geoffrey J.

AU - Barrett, Graham D.

PY - 2019/8/23

Y1 - 2019/8/23

N2 - Purpose: To compare methods of calculating the required intraocular lens (IOL) power for patients undergoing cataract surgery after radial keratotomy (RK), including the 2016 update of the True K formula. Design: Retrospective case series. Participants: A total of 52 eyes of 34 patients who had sequential RK and cataract surgery performed in the same institution by 1 of 2 surgeons. Methods: Seven IOL calculation formulae were evaluated: True K [History], True K [Partial History], True K [No History], Double-K Holladay 1 (DK-Holladay-IOLM), Potvin-Hill, Haigis, and Haigis with a −0.50 diopter (D) offset. Biometry was obtained with the IOLMaster 500 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) and Pentacam (OCULUS Inc, Arlington, WA) devices. Subjective refraction was performed at 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. The achieved spherical equivalent outcome was compared with the target outcome to calculate the absolute error for each eye with each formula. Main Outcome Measures: Median absolute error (MedAE) and mean absolute error (MAE), and percentage of patients within ±0.50 D, ±0.75 D, and ±1.00 D of refractive target. Mean error (ME) was also calculated to demonstrate whether a formula tended toward more myopic or hyperopic outcomes. Results: Best results were achieved with the True K [History]. The MedAE was higher (0.382 vs. 0.275) with the True K [Partial History], but a similar percentage of patients (75.0%–76.6%) achieved within ±0.50 D of target. Of the methods that do not require refractive history, the True K [No History] and unadjusted Haigis were most accurate (69.2% within ±0.50 D of target), with the True K [No History] returning the lowest MedAE but also more of a tendency toward hyperopia (ME +0.269 vs. −0.006 for Haigis). The DK-Holladay-IOLM and Potvin-Hill methods were the least accurate. Conclusions: Knowledge of the refractive history significantly improves the accuracy of IOL calculations in patients undergoing cataract surgery after previous RK. The post-RK refraction appears to be the most important parameter, with inclusion of the pre-RK refraction offering a further slight improvement in MedAE. When no refractive history is available, the True K [No History] and Haigis formulae both perform well, with the added advantage of not requiring data from separate biometric devices.

AB - Purpose: To compare methods of calculating the required intraocular lens (IOL) power for patients undergoing cataract surgery after radial keratotomy (RK), including the 2016 update of the True K formula. Design: Retrospective case series. Participants: A total of 52 eyes of 34 patients who had sequential RK and cataract surgery performed in the same institution by 1 of 2 surgeons. Methods: Seven IOL calculation formulae were evaluated: True K [History], True K [Partial History], True K [No History], Double-K Holladay 1 (DK-Holladay-IOLM), Potvin-Hill, Haigis, and Haigis with a −0.50 diopter (D) offset. Biometry was obtained with the IOLMaster 500 (Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Jena, Germany) and Pentacam (OCULUS Inc, Arlington, WA) devices. Subjective refraction was performed at 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively. The achieved spherical equivalent outcome was compared with the target outcome to calculate the absolute error for each eye with each formula. Main Outcome Measures: Median absolute error (MedAE) and mean absolute error (MAE), and percentage of patients within ±0.50 D, ±0.75 D, and ±1.00 D of refractive target. Mean error (ME) was also calculated to demonstrate whether a formula tended toward more myopic or hyperopic outcomes. Results: Best results were achieved with the True K [History]. The MedAE was higher (0.382 vs. 0.275) with the True K [Partial History], but a similar percentage of patients (75.0%–76.6%) achieved within ±0.50 D of target. Of the methods that do not require refractive history, the True K [No History] and unadjusted Haigis were most accurate (69.2% within ±0.50 D of target), with the True K [No History] returning the lowest MedAE but also more of a tendency toward hyperopia (ME +0.269 vs. −0.006 for Haigis). The DK-Holladay-IOLM and Potvin-Hill methods were the least accurate. Conclusions: Knowledge of the refractive history significantly improves the accuracy of IOL calculations in patients undergoing cataract surgery after previous RK. The post-RK refraction appears to be the most important parameter, with inclusion of the pre-RK refraction offering a further slight improvement in MedAE. When no refractive history is available, the True K [No History] and Haigis formulae both perform well, with the added advantage of not requiring data from separate biometric devices.

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DO - 10.1016/j.ophtha.2019.08.019

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JO - Ophthalmology: journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

JF - Ophthalmology: journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology

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