Metachronous colorectal cancer metastasis: Who, what, when and what to do about it

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Metachronous colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis occurs due to micrometastatic disease, in up to 23% of patients who have undergone curative-intent treatment. Metachronous metastasis tends to occur within 2 years of initial treatment. Diagnosis relies on posttreatment surveillance strategies. Care for patients with metachronous CRC metastasis is complex and requires careful multidisciplinary consideration. Those with isolated and technically resectable diseases are recommended to undergo metastasectomy with adjunct chemotherapy, however, survival, even after curative-intent resection, is poor.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-77
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume129
Issue number1
Early online date17 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2024

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