Message presentation effects in health behaviour communications

Sandra Jones

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

[Truncated] Behavioral Decision Theory (BDT) appears to have potential for explaining and influencing health-related decisions. BDT research examines the influence of task characteristics, particularly message presentation variables, on consumer decisions. This thesis presents a series of 11 studies which apply BDT to health behaviour decisions. The primary aim of the studies was to examine the extent to which message presentation effects influence health behaviour decisions. The studies' findings provide strong support for the existence and influence of presentation effects in health behaviour decision-making.
The three major areas of BDT considered in this thesis, applied to health behaviours such as smoking and exercise, are: 1. Prospect Theory and Message Framing; 2. Prospect Theory and Evaluations of Multiple Consequences; 3. Prospect Theory and Evaluations of Multiple Consequences in Health Behaviour Change.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2002

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This thesis has been made available in the UWA Profiles and Research Repository as part of a UWA Library project to digitise and make available theses completed before 2003. If you are the author of this thesis and would like it removed from the UWA Profiles and Research Repository, please contact digitaltheses-lib@uwa.edu.au

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