MECHANISMS OF CROSS AND MULTIPLE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE IN ALOPECURUS-MYOSUROIDES AND LOLIUM-RIGIDUM

LM Hall, FJ Tardif, Stephen Powles

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium rigidum have developed resistance to herbicides with several modes of action in many herbicide classes. A. myosuroides biotype Peldon A1 from England exhibits non-target site cross resistance to substituted urea and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides (APP) due to enhanced metabolism. L. rigidum biotype SLR 31 from Australia has multiple resistance mechanisms, including both non-target site cross resistance and target site cross resistance. The majority of the SLR 31 population has enhanced metabolism of chlorsulfuron and diclofop-methyl and a mechanism correlated with altered plasma membrane response, which correlates with resistance to some APP and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides. A small proportion of the population also has target site cross resistance to APP a nd CHD herbicides. While A. myosuroides and L. rigidum share common biological elements, they are not unique. Non-target site cross resistance and multiple herbicide resistance is predicted to develop in other weed species. The repercussions of cross and multiple resistance warrant proactive measures to prevent or delay onset.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)17-23
    JournalPhytoprotection
    Volume75
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

    Fingerprint

    Alopecurus myosuroides
    Lolium rigidum
    herbicide resistance
    cross resistance
    herbicides
    biotypes
    chlorsulfuron
    metabolism
    resistance mechanisms
    England
    mechanism of action
    plasma membrane
    urea
    weeds

    Cite this

    @article{2c3965410ac04dcf94a93da66a100054,
    title = "MECHANISMS OF CROSS AND MULTIPLE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE IN ALOPECURUS-MYOSUROIDES AND LOLIUM-RIGIDUM",
    abstract = "Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium rigidum have developed resistance to herbicides with several modes of action in many herbicide classes. A. myosuroides biotype Peldon A1 from England exhibits non-target site cross resistance to substituted urea and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides (APP) due to enhanced metabolism. L. rigidum biotype SLR 31 from Australia has multiple resistance mechanisms, including both non-target site cross resistance and target site cross resistance. The majority of the SLR 31 population has enhanced metabolism of chlorsulfuron and diclofop-methyl and a mechanism correlated with altered plasma membrane response, which correlates with resistance to some APP and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides. A small proportion of the population also has target site cross resistance to APP a nd CHD herbicides. While A. myosuroides and L. rigidum share common biological elements, they are not unique. Non-target site cross resistance and multiple herbicide resistance is predicted to develop in other weed species. The repercussions of cross and multiple resistance warrant proactive measures to prevent or delay onset.",
    author = "LM Hall and FJ Tardif and Stephen Powles",
    year = "1994",
    language = "English",
    volume = "75",
    pages = "17--23",
    journal = "Phytoprotection",
    issn = "0031-9511",
    publisher = "Phytoprotection, IRDA",

    }

    MECHANISMS OF CROSS AND MULTIPLE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE IN ALOPECURUS-MYOSUROIDES AND LOLIUM-RIGIDUM. / Hall, LM; Tardif, FJ; Powles, Stephen.

    In: Phytoprotection, Vol. 75, 1994, p. 17-23.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - MECHANISMS OF CROSS AND MULTIPLE HERBICIDE RESISTANCE IN ALOPECURUS-MYOSUROIDES AND LOLIUM-RIGIDUM

    AU - Hall, LM

    AU - Tardif, FJ

    AU - Powles, Stephen

    PY - 1994

    Y1 - 1994

    N2 - Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium rigidum have developed resistance to herbicides with several modes of action in many herbicide classes. A. myosuroides biotype Peldon A1 from England exhibits non-target site cross resistance to substituted urea and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides (APP) due to enhanced metabolism. L. rigidum biotype SLR 31 from Australia has multiple resistance mechanisms, including both non-target site cross resistance and target site cross resistance. The majority of the SLR 31 population has enhanced metabolism of chlorsulfuron and diclofop-methyl and a mechanism correlated with altered plasma membrane response, which correlates with resistance to some APP and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides. A small proportion of the population also has target site cross resistance to APP a nd CHD herbicides. While A. myosuroides and L. rigidum share common biological elements, they are not unique. Non-target site cross resistance and multiple herbicide resistance is predicted to develop in other weed species. The repercussions of cross and multiple resistance warrant proactive measures to prevent or delay onset.

    AB - Alopecurus myosuroides and Lolium rigidum have developed resistance to herbicides with several modes of action in many herbicide classes. A. myosuroides biotype Peldon A1 from England exhibits non-target site cross resistance to substituted urea and aryloxyphenoxypropionate herbicides (APP) due to enhanced metabolism. L. rigidum biotype SLR 31 from Australia has multiple resistance mechanisms, including both non-target site cross resistance and target site cross resistance. The majority of the SLR 31 population has enhanced metabolism of chlorsulfuron and diclofop-methyl and a mechanism correlated with altered plasma membrane response, which correlates with resistance to some APP and cyclohexanedione (CHD) herbicides. A small proportion of the population also has target site cross resistance to APP a nd CHD herbicides. While A. myosuroides and L. rigidum share common biological elements, they are not unique. Non-target site cross resistance and multiple herbicide resistance is predicted to develop in other weed species. The repercussions of cross and multiple resistance warrant proactive measures to prevent or delay onset.

    M3 - Article

    VL - 75

    SP - 17

    EP - 23

    JO - Phytoprotection

    JF - Phytoprotection

    SN - 0031-9511

    ER -