Maternal and paternal mental health problems and the risk of offspring depression in late adolescence: findings from the Raine study

Getinet Ayano, Kim Betts, Ashleigh Lin, Robert Tait, Rosa Alati

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: There are limited studies on the risk of depressive symptoms in adolescent offspring exposed to parental mental health problems in middle childhood. Aim: We investigated the association between parental mental health problems, particularly paternal emotional problems and maternal symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the risk of depressive symptoms in adolescent offspring aged 17. Methods: The study included 995 parent-offspring pairs from the 1989–91 birth cohort (the Raine Study) in Western Australia. Log-binomial regression was used to assess the associations. Results: An increased risk of depression symptoms was observed in the adolescent offspring of mothers with depressive [RR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13–1.86] as well as anxiety symptoms [RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.09–1.87].Compared to those non-exposed, offspring whose mothers reported comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms were more likely to have developed depressive symptoms by late adolescence [RR 1.63, 95%CI 1.11–2.38]. An increased risk of depressive symptoms was also seen in the offspring of fathers with emotional problems [RR 1.29, 95%CI 1.01–1.53]. Conclusion: Our findings suggest an increased risk of depressive symptoms in the adolescent offspring of parents with mental health problems, specifically paternal emotional problems (29%) and maternal anxiety (43%), depression (45%), as well as comorbid anxiety and depressive symptoms (63%).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-357
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Mental Health
Volume30
Issue number3
Early online date2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Maternal and paternal mental health problems and the risk of offspring depression in late adolescence: findings from the Raine study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this