Marine bioerosion

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research conducted in the Mediterranean significantly contributed to our understanding of bioerosion, providing faunistic records and key information about the succession that occurs when fresh substrate is colonized by eroding biota. Bioeroders that have a substantial role in the Mediterranean are microendoliths, sponges, boring mollusks and various grazers. A multitude of environmental factors controls their abundances, diversities and eroding capacities. With ongoing climate change, several of these factors are likely to magnify the effects of bioerosion in the Mediterranean and worldwide. We regard eutrophication as the most important in the Mediterranean, but climate change, especially ocean acidification, will also have an important effect. Should bioerosion levels change, characteristic limestone coasts will be impacted, as will be community and sediment compositions, enigmatic cold-water coral ecosystems, mollusk aquaculture and man- made materials that are submerged. Understudied topics in Mediterranean bioerosion include rates, interactions at community level, as well as direct effects of climate change.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges
EditorsStefano Goffredo, Zvy Dubinsky
PublisherSpringer
Pages449-461
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9789400767041
ISBN (Print)9789400767034
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

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bioerosion
Climate Change
Mollusca
climate change
mollusc culture
Eutrophication
Biota
Anthozoa
Aquaculture
Calcium Carbonate
Porifera
Mediterranean climate
Oceans and Seas
limestone
molluscs
eutrophication
faunistics
Ecosystem
corals
boring

Cite this

Schönberg, C. H. L., & Wisshak, M. (2014). Marine bioerosion. In S. Goffredo, & Z. Dubinsky (Eds.), The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges (pp. 449-461). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6704-1_26
Schönberg, Christine H.L. ; Wisshak, Max. / Marine bioerosion. The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges. editor / Stefano Goffredo ; Zvy Dubinsky. Springer, 2014. pp. 449-461
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Schönberg, CHL & Wisshak, M 2014, Marine bioerosion. in S Goffredo & Z Dubinsky (eds), The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges. Springer, pp. 449-461. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6704-1_26

Marine bioerosion. / Schönberg, Christine H.L.; Wisshak, Max.

The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges. ed. / Stefano Goffredo; Zvy Dubinsky. Springer, 2014. p. 449-461.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperChapter

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BT - The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges

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Schönberg CHL, Wisshak M. Marine bioerosion. In Goffredo S, Dubinsky Z, editors, The Mediterranean Sea: Its History and Present Challenges. Springer. 2014. p. 449-461 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-6704-1_26