Mapping the entrepreneurial behavior of life science academics in Australian universities: an exploratory study

Alicia Castillo Holley

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

[Truncated abstract] Academic research should generate breakthrough knowledge that, in tum, should provide high-value solutions to society whilst generating significant financial gains for academic institutions. The reality, however, is far from encouraging (Swamidass & Vulasa, 2009). Despite a considerable amount of research in areas such as intellectual property and technology transfer, there is a need for a better understanding of academics as entrepreneurs (Ho & Wilson, 2007); as well as the process of academic entrepreneurship, especially from the academics' perspective (and including the views of academics who have not participated in any academic entrepreneurial activity). This study sought to deepen our understanding of the process of academic entrepreneurship, from the academics' perspective, by capturing the wide variety of views held and roles undertaken by life science academics with regard to the discovery and exploitation of commercial opportunities based on their research discoveries. As a result, this research should: help in the development and evaluation of public and institutional policies concerning research commercialization; support a stronger collaboration between academia, industry, government, and the community; and contribute to a better understanding of entrepreneurial theories in the academic context.
LanguageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Publication statusUnpublished - 2014

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entrepreneurial behavior
life sciences
university
technology transfer
research policy
intellectual property
commercialization
research results
entrepreneur
exploitation
industry
evaluation
community

Cite this

@phdthesis{bc286b4c3eb64870bfe5f691836bebd6,
title = "Mapping the entrepreneurial behavior of life science academics in Australian universities: an exploratory study",
abstract = "[Truncated abstract] Academic research should generate breakthrough knowledge that, in tum, should provide high-value solutions to society whilst generating significant financial gains for academic institutions. The reality, however, is far from encouraging (Swamidass & Vulasa, 2009). Despite a considerable amount of research in areas such as intellectual property and technology transfer, there is a need for a better understanding of academics as entrepreneurs (Ho & Wilson, 2007); as well as the process of academic entrepreneurship, especially from the academics' perspective (and including the views of academics who have not participated in any academic entrepreneurial activity). This study sought to deepen our understanding of the process of academic entrepreneurship, from the academics' perspective, by capturing the wide variety of views held and roles undertaken by life science academics with regard to the discovery and exploitation of commercial opportunities based on their research discoveries. As a result, this research should: help in the development and evaluation of public and institutional policies concerning research commercialization; support a stronger collaboration between academia, industry, government, and the community; and contribute to a better understanding of entrepreneurial theories in the academic context.",
keywords = "Academic entrepreneurship, Technology transfer, Research commercialization, Academic capitalism",
author = "{Castillo Holley}, Alicia",
year = "2014",
language = "English",

}

Mapping the entrepreneurial behavior of life science academics in Australian universities: an exploratory study. / Castillo Holley, Alicia.

2014.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - Mapping the entrepreneurial behavior of life science academics in Australian universities: an exploratory study

AU - Castillo Holley, Alicia

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - [Truncated abstract] Academic research should generate breakthrough knowledge that, in tum, should provide high-value solutions to society whilst generating significant financial gains for academic institutions. The reality, however, is far from encouraging (Swamidass & Vulasa, 2009). Despite a considerable amount of research in areas such as intellectual property and technology transfer, there is a need for a better understanding of academics as entrepreneurs (Ho & Wilson, 2007); as well as the process of academic entrepreneurship, especially from the academics' perspective (and including the views of academics who have not participated in any academic entrepreneurial activity). This study sought to deepen our understanding of the process of academic entrepreneurship, from the academics' perspective, by capturing the wide variety of views held and roles undertaken by life science academics with regard to the discovery and exploitation of commercial opportunities based on their research discoveries. As a result, this research should: help in the development and evaluation of public and institutional policies concerning research commercialization; support a stronger collaboration between academia, industry, government, and the community; and contribute to a better understanding of entrepreneurial theories in the academic context.

AB - [Truncated abstract] Academic research should generate breakthrough knowledge that, in tum, should provide high-value solutions to society whilst generating significant financial gains for academic institutions. The reality, however, is far from encouraging (Swamidass & Vulasa, 2009). Despite a considerable amount of research in areas such as intellectual property and technology transfer, there is a need for a better understanding of academics as entrepreneurs (Ho & Wilson, 2007); as well as the process of academic entrepreneurship, especially from the academics' perspective (and including the views of academics who have not participated in any academic entrepreneurial activity). This study sought to deepen our understanding of the process of academic entrepreneurship, from the academics' perspective, by capturing the wide variety of views held and roles undertaken by life science academics with regard to the discovery and exploitation of commercial opportunities based on their research discoveries. As a result, this research should: help in the development and evaluation of public and institutional policies concerning research commercialization; support a stronger collaboration between academia, industry, government, and the community; and contribute to a better understanding of entrepreneurial theories in the academic context.

KW - Academic entrepreneurship

KW - Technology transfer

KW - Research commercialization

KW - Academic capitalism

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -