Managing cognitive load with a flipped language class: An ethnographic study of the student experience

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This ethnographic study of a beginning-level German course at an Australian university examined the student experience of learning second language (L2) grammar in a flipped classroom. Students accessed explicit grammar instruction and completed grammar exercises prior to attending face-to-face classes; during class, the structures were briefly reviewed by the students and then applied in interactive task-based activities focused on meaningful use of the L2. In surveys and interviews, learners reported that the opportunity to manage the pace and depth of their interaction with online grammar modules facilitated their learning and increased their confidence. Linking these outcomes to research that has shown that flipped teaching models reduce or assist in the management of cognitive load, the study presents a compelling case for flipping the L2 classroom.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)551-575
JournalForeign Language Annals
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

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