Management of non-severe burn wounds in children and adolescents: optimising outcomes through all stages of the patient journey

Leila Cuttle, Mark Fear, Fiona M. Wood, Roy M. Kimble, Andrew J.A. Holland

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paediatric burn injuries are common, especially in children younger than 5 years, and can lead to poor physical and psychosocial outcomes in the long term. In this Review, we aim to summarise the key factors and interventions before hospital admission and following discharge that can improve the long-term outcomes of paediatric burns. Care can be optimised through first aid treatment, correct initial assessment of burn severity, and appropriate patient referral to a burns centre. Scar prevention or treatment and patient follow-up after discharge are also essential. As most burn injuries in children are comparatively small and readily survivable, this Review does not cover the perioperative management associated with severe burns that require fluid resuscitation, or inhalational injury. Burns disproportionately affect children from low socioeconomic backgrounds and those living in low-income and middle-income countries, with ample evidence to suggest that there remains scope for low-cost interventions to improve care for those patients with the greatest burden of burn injury. Current knowledge gaps and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-278
Number of pages10
JournalThe Lancet Child and Adolescent Health
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Management of non-severe burn wounds in children and adolescents: optimising outcomes through all stages of the patient journey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this